The Clever New Way TV Advertises Alcohol to Kids | Rebecca Jackson

October 30, 2014

We know that children and teenagers are particularly susceptible to advertising. We are aware that they are easily influenced by peer pressure. We see that they have a self-image that is fragile and is still being molded. Parents, educators and advertising executives are all aware of these simple truths…

via The Clever New Way TV Advertises Alcohol to Kids | Rebecca Jackson.


▶ Opioid Task Force To Implement LST Program In Schools – YouTube

October 9, 2014

The Opioid Task Force is taking vital steps to stop the use of drugs in Franklin County, Massachusetts. Franklin County middle schools will begin implementing the Botvin LifeSkills Training program in an effort to combat the rate of opiate use in the area.

“This is an incredibly effective program. Its been well researched and shown to have really impressive outcomes at reducing youth substance use as well as youth violence and other risky behaviors” said Kat Allen, Co-chair of Communities That Care Coalition.

The LifeSkills Training Program has proven to reduce tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use by 80%.

“It’s really positive. It focuses on things like communication skills, decision-making skills, conflict resolution, coping with anxiety, coping with anger,” said Allen.

via ▶ Opioid Task Force To Implement LST Program In Schools – YouTube.


$15k Grants for Life Skills Programs

September 3, 2014

Peyback Foundation – Grants for Programs which Directly Benefit Economically Disadvantaged Youth

Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015

“The PeyBack Foundation focuses primarily on economically disadvantaged youth. Emphasis is placed on programs that have a direct benefit to children through relationships and activities. Programs that are intended to enrich the lives of disadvantaged youth through activities conducted outside the typical school day (i.e., after-school and summer programming) are particularly favored by the Foundation. Our field of interest is in youth development. This includes:

Leadership and Life Skills - We are interested in supporting interactive programs that develop leadership skills and enhance character. Examples of programs: teaching youth how to identify their career or educational goal so they can become self sufficient; or programs that teach respect of self and others and provide cultural opportunities.

Mentoring – We are interested in programs that provide a caring adult who is working with disadvantaged youth. Programs include homework assistance, character building, improving self-esteem and confidence. The Foundation is interested in funding activities and programs that occur within the mentoring relationship, not adult volunteer training or recruitment.

After School/Summer Programming – The Foundation is especially interested in supporting programs that occur outside of a typical school day; i.e. after-school and summer programming.

Healthy Living – We are interested in programs that engage youth in physical activity and provide nutritious snacks and/or meals for youth participants. Consideration will be provided to programs that supply the necessary tools for a child to succeed educationally outside of the typical school environment.”

Funder: The PeyBack Foundation

Eligibility: Nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations operating in Colorado, Indiana, Louisiana, and Tennessee… “It is mandatory that grant applications come from organizations that work with children who are economically disadvantaged. Organizations must work with children between the ages of 6-18. The PeyBack Foundation will provide funding to support program-specific expenses, not general administrative expenses of an organization.”

Amount: Up to $15,000

via Peyback Foundation » Grant Program.


Apply now for tobacco-use prevention grants from VFHY | www.vfhy.org

August 18, 2014

Apply now for tobacco-use prevention grants from VFHY | http://www.vfhy.org

Deadline is 10/16/14

via Apply now for tobacco-use prevention grants from VFHY | www.vfhy.org.


California Department of Education – Tobacco Use Prevention Education Funding

July 17, 2014

Funding Name: American Indian Education Centers: Tobacco-Use Prevention Education Program

 

Eligible Applicants: nonprofit organizations, other organizations or agencies

 

Required Eligibility Criteria: Only state-funded American Indian Education Centers are eligible to apply. The applicant center must have met the commercial tobacco-free criteria, as outlined in the Request for Applications.

 

Funding Description: Funding is available for American Indian Education Centers to implement supplemental prevention education, intervention and cessation programs, and youth development programs directed at the reduction of commercial tobacco use among American Indian youth.

 

View at http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fo/profile.asp?id=3586


Program Structure – LifeSkills Training

July 8, 2014

The LifeSkills Training program is uniquely designed to be flexible and interactive. The program can be taught either on an intensive schedule (2-3 times a week) until the program is complete, or on a more extended schedule (once a week until the program is complete). Both formats have proven to be effective.

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While one year of LST has been proven to achieve measurable positive effects, multi-year implementation is strongly recommended.

http://www.lifeskillstraining.com/structure.php


HHS/CDC Releases Preventing Youth Violence: Opportunities for Action

July 1, 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC)  Preventing Youth Violence: Opportunities for Action and its companion guide provide information and actions to help all community members be a part of the solution.

There are steps that community leaders and members, public health professionals, families, adults who work with youth, and young people can take today that can stop youth violence before it starts.

Learn More

Striving to Reduce Youth Violence Everywhere


HHS/CDC Releases 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey Results

June 23, 2014

On June 12, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s,  Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) released the 2013 national, state, and local Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) results on the YRBS website at www.cdc.gov/yrbs.

YRBS provides data representative of students in grades 9–12 attending U.S. high schools. It monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among high school students—behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection; unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity—plus the prevalence of asthma and obesity.

The release includes: 

* an MMWR Surveillance Summary that includes results from the 2013 National YRBS and from 42 state and 21 local YRBSs

* new fact sheets and summary documents

* an updated version of Youth Online – a web-based data system that allows users to view and analyze national, state, and local YRBS results

* an updated version of the YRBS Data Widget – a small web application that national, state, and local partners can place directly on their agency’s or organization’s website to help disseminate YRBS results quickly and conveniently

* public-use datasets and technical documentation

  For more information about the YRBS:

* Website: www.cdc.gov/yrbs

* Phone: 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)

* E-mail: nccddashinfo@cdc.gov

* Follow us on Twitter: @DrZazaCDC


Another success story: Italy adapts Botvin LifeSkills Training | Prevention Hub

June 19, 2014

One of the most widely used school-based prevention programmes has proven to be effective in reducing drug use among adolescents in yet another country. After a team of researchers translated the programme known as Botvin LifeSkills Training into Italian, it was launched in around 180 schools in Lombardy, a region of Northern Italy. Within those schools the programme reached approximately 30,000 students and involved 1,800 teachers. The programme was found to reduce teenage smoking rates by 40% while boosting students’ self-esteem and equipping them with the relevant skills to deal with stressful situations. Following the success of the programme in Northern Italy, the Regional Observatory on Drug Addiction of Lombardy would like to see the programme implemented in schools across the country.

Links:

via Another success story: Italy adapts Botvin LifeSkills Training | Prevention Hub.


A Guide to Federal Education Programs That Can Fund K-12 Universal Prevention and Social and Emotional Learning

June 17, 2014

The Center on Education Policy and the Center for Health and Health Care in Schools created this user-friendly guide that highlights 15 federal elementary and secondary education programs where the statutory language or the regulations/guidance that accompanies a program appear to permit funds to be used to support universal prevention programs and social and emotional learning initiatives. The guide also provides examples of schools, districts, and state education agencies that have successfully supported their prevention programs with federal education dollars.  You can access the guide here:  http://www.cep-dc.org/displayDocument.cfm?DocumentID=437


LifeSkills Training Prevention Program Cuts Teen Smoking Rates in Italy

June 10, 2014

Results from a new multi-year initiative provide further evidence that a school prevention program called Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) can dramatically cut teen cigarette smoking. After identifying LST as the top-rated prevention program, researchers in Italy translated the LST program into Italian and adapted it for Italian youth. Preliminary data show that the LST program cut the rate of cigarette smoking by 40% among participating Italian youth compared to those who did not receive the program. The results were presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Previous research with LST shows that it prevents tobacco, alcohol, illicit drugs, violence, and delinquency.

Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, developer of the LST program, and Dr. Veronica Velasco, a psychologist and researcher at The Regional Observatory on Drug Addiction (OReD) of Lombardy, Italy (who participated via video) reported that LST also increased drug refusal skills and anti-drug attitudes compared to controls, and increased adaptive coping skills, interpersonal skills, and sense of well-being among participating students (ages 11-14). 

Read more…

via LifeSkills Training: Press Releases.


An explosion of youth exposure to e-cigarette TV ads

June 9, 2014

As the federal government moves to set rules that would ban the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors, a new study shows that TV ads for the products have increased dramatically during programs most likely to be watched by adolescents and young adults.

According to the study published online today by the journal Pediatrics, between 2011 and 2013 exposure to e-cigarette TV ads increased by 256% among adolescents ages 12 to 17 and by 321% among young adults, ages 18 to 24.

via An \’explosion\’ of youth exposure to e-cigarette TV ads.


Apply for a $2k Mini-Grant to Combat Tobacco Use

June 2, 2014

Schools and Community Youth Groups: Apply before June 30 at YStreet.org for a $2,000 grant to sponsor a Y Street group!

Y Street is the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth’s award-winning teen volunteer initiative for high school students. The Y Street Grant program was launched in 2008 to recruit youth throughout Virginia to work on health related projects within their communities. Grant recipients receive up to $2,000 while simultaneously tackling important issues related to tobacco and childhood obesity. School-based and community-based organizations located in Virginia that work with high school teens are encouraged to apply to become part of this statewide movement.

http://www.ystreet.org/grants.php


The FY 2014 National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Expansion Project solicitation has been released

May 29, 2014

The FY 2014 National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Expansion Project solicitation has been released.

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is seeking applications for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Expansion Project. This initiative furthers DOJ’s mission by combating youth violence through a comprehensive approach to prevention, intervention, suppression, and reentry.

Lead applicants may partner with a collaborative body that includes representation from city/county leadership, law enforcement, public health, courts, workforce development, housing and urban development, educators, and faith and community members. Partners should collectively have expertise in prevention, intervention, enforcement, and reentry.

The application deadline is June 23rd. For information about the Expansion Project please go to: http://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2014/Forum.pdf

Grants.gov number assigned to this announcement: OJJDP-2014-3900


Are your students prepared for the real world once they graduate?

May 27, 2014

Register for today’s webinar to learn more:

Preparing Students for Success after Graduation with Botvin LST Transitions

Webinar: Are you looking for a program that can teach students skills for success as they transition from high school to the workplace or college? Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training Transitions program can help your students as they move from older adolescence into young adulthood. This program is a dynamic, skill-building prevention program specifically designed to bolster their thriving in new environments.

Transitions-for-wwwIn this informative presentation, participants will explore critical skill development for older adolescents. Learn about: the essential skills taught in the LST Transitions program, fidelity and implementation options, and how this program can prepare students for the future.

Duration: 30 minutes

Presenter: Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years. He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the LifeSkills Training program.

Register: Tuesday, May 27th 4pm ET: http://tinyurl.com/q4fvezm


Have a safe and healthy Memorial Day

May 26, 2014

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Students in Italy Learn Valuable Life Skills from America’s Top Prevention Program

May 16, 2014

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Countries around the world continue to grapple with the problem of teenage drug abuse. In their search for effective prevention programs, more and more countries are turning to programs proven to work in America. Such is the case in Italy, where health professionals and educators have turned to the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program, extensively tested and widely regarded as America’s top prevention program for children and adolescents.

Pictured left to right: Dr. Kenneth Griffin, Dr. Christopher Williams, Dr. Veronica Velasco, Dr. Gilbert J. BotvinIn the Mediterranean culture, young people start drinking at a much earlier age than in other regions. A recent survey showed that drinking and drug use in Italy increases between ages 13 and 15 years old. To combat that, researchers in Italy have adapted, translated and implemented the LST program first in Milan and more recently in schools throughout the Lombardy region of Italy. Through the LST program, students not only learn how to resist pressures to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and use illicit drugs. They also learn important life skills such as problem-solving, how to manage stress and anxiety, and how to communicate clearly. The combination of drug resistance skills and life skills has proven to be a powerful formula for preventing drug use. Studies in the US show that LST can cut rates of drug use in half, and in some cases by as much as 80% compared to teens not receiving LST.   

The Regional Observatory on Drug Addiction (OReD) of Lombardy, Italy, is spearheading this project. Ultimately, they hope to see that all students in the country receive the LST program. The OReD of Lombardy, under the auspices of Eupolis Lombardia and in association with the Regional Network on Addiction Prevention, supports different prevention programs throughout the schools in its region.

Dr. Veronica Velasco, a psychologist and researcher at ORed, is the manager of the LST project in Lombardy under the direction of Mr. Corrado Celata. She recently met with LST developer, Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, and reported on the adaptation of the program and its dissemination in Italy.  

We chose LST because it was clearly the highest quality program available,” said Dr. Velasco.  “It was also very important to us that LST is evidence-based, and fits all 16 NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse) principles of prevention.”

“We are thrilled that more than 1,600 teachers and 20,000 students are participating in one of the first region-wide health projects ever delivered in Italy,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, program developer and professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College. “Dr. Velasco is leading a highly dedicated team of health professionals and educators in the implementation of LST in Italy, and we are delighted to hear of its success there.”

The project started in Milan, the capital of the Lombardy region, and then expanded to the rest of Lombardy. Lombardy is a very densely populated area (10 million people) with 15 health communities and 150 schools. Dr. Velasco and Dr. Botvin will present the details of this project at the annual meeting of the Society for Prevention Research on May 30, 2014 in Washington DC.

via LifeSkills Training: Press Releases.


Funding Opportunity- Minority Youth Violence Prevention: Integrating Public Health and Community Policing Approaches

May 14, 2014

Minority Youth Violence Prevention (MYVP) will support program interventions developed through adaptations, refinements, and modifications of promising violence prevention and crime reduction models that are tailored to at-risk minority male youth (10-18 years old) and integrate a problem solving approach. These approaches should simultaneously address public health and public safety concerns and be tailored to at-risk minority male youth. Applicants should demonstrate a partnership among disciplines, and include public health, law enforcement, and other criminal justice/public safety stakeholders, and organizations that specifically provide minority youth violence prevention services (e.g. community policing programs, juvenile services and the courts. Applicants must identify an established or promising violence prevention/crime reduction model and integrate the CDC public health or the SARA model to address the specific problem(s)identified among at-risk minority male youth in the target community.

Funder: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health

Eligibility:  • State and local governments or their Bona Fide Agents • Local public health agencies (county and municipal) • State, local and tribal law enforcement agencies • Nonprofit with 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institution of higher education) • Nonprofit without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institution of higher education) • For-profit organizations (other than small business) For profit organizations must agree to forgo any profit or management fee. • Small, minority, and women-owned business • Universities • Colleges • Research institutions • Hospitals • Community-based organizations • Faith-based organizations • Federally recognized or state-recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribal governmengt • American Indian/Alaska Native tribally designated organizations • Alaska Native health organizations • Urban Indian health organizations • Tribal epidemiology centers.

Amount: $300,000 – $400,000.

Contact: Link.

Deadline: June 20, 2014


Funding Opportunity: Youth Empowerment Program II: (YEP II)

May 13, 2014

The YEP II focuses on the risk behaviors of at-risk minority male youth at critical stages in their lives, and improving long-term outcomes to increase the quality of their lives. Projects should address one or more of the following focus areas:1) minority male youth violence (including gang violence);2) teen pregnancy prevention education as it relates to males;3) career preparation training that is appropriate for at-risk minority male youth; and 4) mentoring support services (education and/or college preparation).

Funder: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health

Eligibility: •Nonprofit with 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institution of higher education) •Nonprofit without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institution of higher education) •For-profit organizations (other than small business) •Small, minority, and women-owned business •Universities •Colleges •Research institutions • Hospitals • Community-based organizations •Faith-based organizations •Federally recognized or state-recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribal governments • American Indian/Alaska Native tribally designated organizations •Alaska Native health organizations •Urban Indian health organizations •Tribal epidemiology centers •State and local governments or their Bona Fide Agents •Political subdivisions of states.

Amount: $250,000 – $500,000.

Contact: Link.

Deadline: June 13, 2014

 


US Department of Education, School Climate Transformation Grants

May 9, 2014

US Department of Education, School Climate Transformation Grant—Local Educational Grants, “Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year 2014″ Released

 

The School Climate Transformation Grant—Local Educational Agency Grants program provides competitive grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to develop, enhance, or expand systems of support for, and technical assistance to, schools implementing an evidence-based multi-tiered behavioral framework for improving behavioral outcomes and learning conditions for all students.

 

Eligible Applicants:  LEAs, or consortia of LEAs.

 

Application Deadline Date:  June 23, 2014

 

Estimated Available Funds:  $23,625,000

 

More detailed information is available online at: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/schoolclimatelea

 

US Department of Education, School Climate Transformation Grant—State Educational Agency Grants, “Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year 2014″ Released

 

The School Climate Transformation Grant—State Educational Agency Grants program provides competitive grants to State educational agencies (SEAs) to develop, enhance, or expand statewide systems of support for, and technical assistance to, local educational agencies and schools implementing an evidence-based, multi-tiered behavioral framework for improving behavioral outcomes and learning conditions for all students.

 

Eligible Applicants:  SEAs

 

Application Deadline Date:  June 23, 2014

 

Estimated Available Funds:  $7,375,000

 

More detailed information is available online at: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/schoolclimatesea


Botvin LifeSkills Training: Prevention Newsletter

May 7, 2014

Our 2014 Spring Newsletter is now online. Check it out to learn more about prevention tips, funding, training.

via Botvin LifeSkills Training: Prevention Newsletter.


Botvin LifeSkills Training Program Featured at International Conference

April 29, 2014

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Botvin LifeSkills Training, a top-rated prevention program proven to reduce substance abuse and violence, was featured at the 2014 Blueprints Conference for Healthy Youth Development. The conference, held in Denver, Colorado, featured LifeSkills Training (LST) and other prevention programs identified as effective by a national panel of prevention experts. Dr. Botvin’s presentation described the LST program and summarized the scientific evidence proving its effectiveness. The session also focused on practical strategies for promoting the adopting and successful implementation of evidence-based prevention programs such as LST. Joining Dr. Botvin were Alayne MacArthur and Pamela Werb, two senior LST trainers who have extensive teaching, training, and curriculum development experience.  In addition, LST was featured in a well-attended all-day pre-conference workshop session. Attendees participated in an interactive, peer-based training experience covering important topics related to the successful implementation and sustainability of the LST program with an emphasis on strategies for enhancing planning, implementation, student engagement and long-term use of LST. 

The goal of the international Blueprints Conference is to motivate the violence and drug prevention field to adopt evidence-based programs and provide support, guidance, and tools to help practitioners implement these programs successfully in their own communities. More than 500 people attended, including professionals working in the areas of juvenile justice, violence, and drug abuse prevention for youth. The Blueprints Conference is part of a larger initiative to identify and promote the use of prevention programs proven effective through rigorous evaluation research.

“The Blueprints initiative has a tremendous impact on all prevention because it gives decision-makers the tools necessary to identify the most effective programs,” said invited speaker Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, an internationally known prevention expert and developer of the LifeSkills Training (LST) substance abuse and violence prevention program. “In order to improve the quality of health in America and reduce future health costs, it is vitally important that those responsible for selecting and adopting programs have access to information about the most effective and scientifically proven prevention programs and policies.”

LifeSkills Training is a model prevention program identified by Blueprints for Violence Prevention, the national violence prevention initiative. Established in 1996 by Professor Del Elliott from the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence (CSPV) at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Blueprints for Violence Prevention monitors the effectiveness of prevention, early intervention, and treatment programs in reducing adolescent violent crime, aggression, delinquency, and substance abuse. More recently, this initiative has been expanded to focus more broadly on healthy youth development.

via LifeSkills Training: Press Releases.


LifeSkills Goes to Taipei, Taiwan

April 25, 2014

LifeSkills Goes to Taipei, Taiwan

One of our rockstar trainers, Pam Werb, shared these awesome pictures from a LifeSkills Training Middle School workshop that she’s leading in Taipei, Taiwan right now. Any of these teaching skills look familiar to you? :)


Get Ready for National Prevention Week May 18-24

April 21, 2014

To help shine a light on the importance of substance abuse prevention, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA) has named May 18-24 National Prevention Week 2014. The theme this year is Our Lives. Our Health. Our Future.

via Get Ready for National Prevention Week May 18-24 | CADCA.


Every Dollar Spent on Prevention Can Save up to $50 | Prevention Hub

April 17, 2014

A recent study by the Washington State Institute for Public Policy investigates the effectiveness of drug abuse and violence prevention programmes. Among the programmes the Botvin LifeSkills Training, which is used in 37 countries around the world, yielded the most promising results, saving $50 for every dollar spent. The school-based model proves that prevention programmes do not only provide enormous health benefits to young people, but also economic advantages for the communities they live in. Mentor USA uses the programme as part of their school-based prevention strategy.

Botvin LifeSkills Training equips students aged 5 to 18 with the relevant skills to deal with stressful situations and helps boost their self-esteem. By engaging with the programme, students learn about the negative consequences of substance abuse and become familiar with healthy alternatives.

via Every Dollar Spent on Prevention Can Save up to $50 | Prevention Hub.


Service Learning Grants Available

April 16, 2014

“The Youth Advisory Board grants funds for student-led service-learning projects in the United States and in the Alberta, New Brunswick and Ontario provinces of Canada. These grants address, in a structural way, the issues of environmental responsibility, community safety and natural disaster preparedness, financial education, societal health and wellness issues, and accessing higher education/closing the achievement gap.”

Funder: State Farm Youth Advisory Board 

Eligibility: To receive a grant from the State Farm Youth Advisory Board, organizations/institutions must be located in the United States or Canada. Primary applicant can be anyone involved with a public K-12, public charter, or higher education institution. Non-profit organizations are also eligible if they are able to demonstrate how they plan to actively interact with students in public K-12 schools. Applicants must also have a demonstrated capacity to effectively manage grant funds.

Amount: $25,000 – $100,000

via LifeSkills Training: Funding Opportunities.


Teens and Young Adults Exposed to Tobacco Marketing More Likely to Smoke

April 15, 2014

Teens and young adults who are exposed to marketing materials for tobacco products, such as coupons and websites, were far more likely to begin smoking or to be current smokers than those not exposed, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The findings were reported by Health Behavior News Service.

via Tobacco Promotions Still Reaching Youth | Center for Advancing Health.


Three Ohio Agencies Win Drug Prevention Grants

April 11, 2014

NEW PHILADELPHIA  Agencies in three area counties have received grants from the state to strengthen school-based alcohol and drug prevention programs.

The Building Youth Resiliency grants are a part of Start Talking!, Ohio’s new youth drug prevention initiative. The program is a partnership between the Office of the First Lady, the Governor’s Office of Faith-Base Initiatives and the departments of Aging, Job and Family Services and Mental Health and Addiction Services and targets at-risk students in grades five through nine.

In Tuscarawas County, Personal and Family Counseling Services is receiving a grant of $12,875 to provide the Botvin LifeSkills Training Program to 190 fifth- and sixth-grade students in Newcomerstown Exempted Village Schools and Conotton Valley Union Local Schools.

The program will begin in the 2014-15 school year.

Jodi Salvo, coordinator of the Taking It to the Schools program, said Botvin is the leading school-based prevention education program used in the U.S.

Facilitators from Personal and Family Counseling meet with students once a week for eight weeks. Each week, they discuss a different topic, such as self-esteem and assertiveness.

On the eighth week, parents or caregivers are invited to come to the school for a graduation ceremony, she said. “It gives us the opportunity to show the parents what we discussed.”

via LifeSkills Training: News Detail.


New Report Highlights the Economic Power of Prevention: LifeSkills Training Program Saves $50 for Every $1 Spent

April 10, 2014
Investing in prevention makes great economic sense, according to a new study. The report, part of a series of economic studies conducted by the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP), determined that communities will reap substantial savings by using effective drug abuse and violence prevention programs. Among the most dramatic findings were those for a drug abuse and violence prevention program called Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST). Researchers found that the LST program produced a $50 benefit for every $1 invested–yielding the highest return on investment of any substance abuse prevention curriculum studied.

“We know that effective prevention programs can produce a powerful public health benefit by helping teens avoid the damaging effects of tobacco, alcohol, illicit drug abuse, and violence. This updated report proves that it has the added benefit of also making good economic sense,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College and developer of the LST program. “A relatively small upfront investment in a proven prevention program such as LST can yield tremendous health and economic benefits in terms of both the positive health effects it provides students and the potential cost savings for communities and the larger society.”

Tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug abuse cost the United States over $500 billion a year. Therefore, the nationwide use of prevention programs that have been tested and proven effective offer considerable economic benefits at a time when health costs are spiraling higher each year. Unfortunately, surveys show that most schools are not using programs proven to work. And just as programs vary in effectiveness, they also vary in their costs, economic benefits, and potential return on investment.  Encouraging the use of tested and effective prevention programs shown to produce a high return on investment can produce substantial savings and help cut health costs throughout the country.

Washington State Institute for Public Policy provided the results of new analyses in their most recent report entitled “Return on Investment: Evidence-Based Options to Improve Statewide Outcomes.” The report, similar to an investment advisor’s “buy-sell” list, contains current recommendations on policy options that can give taxpayers a good return on their investment (“buys”), as well as those that apparently cannot (“sells”). Investing in LST represents a 50-to-1 return to communities in terms of reduced corrections costs, welfare and social services burdens, drug and mental health treatment, and increased employment and tax revenue. This 50-to-1 return is an increase over the last report in April 2012 of a 38-to-1 return.

About Botvin LifeSkills Training

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) is an evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program used in schools and communities throughout the U.S. and in 36 countries around the world. LST has been extensively tested and proven to reduce tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use by as much as 80%. It is effective when implemented using different delivery formats, when taught by different providers, and when delivered to different populations. It works with elementary school, middle school, and high school students. Long-term follow-up studies also show that it produces prevention effects that are durable and long-lasting. For more information call 800-293-4969 or visit www.lifeskillstraining.com.

Contact:

Paulina Kalaj

800-293-4969

pkalaj@nhpamail.com

via LifeSkills Training: Press Releases.


Coshocton Behavioral Health Awarded Grant to Teach LST

April 9, 2014

Ohio’s putting its money — $1.5 million across 19 counties — where its mouth is for the Start Talking! campaign, which encourages children to avoid drugs by overcoming peer pressure and stresses that often lead to addiction.

Coshocton Behavioral Health Choices will receive $62,256 to teach students in fifth through ninth grades at Coshocton City, Ridgewood Local and River View Local schools how to reduce the risks of alcohol and drug abuse, according to a Monday Start Talking!

The program, called Life­Skills Training, addresses the social and psychological factors that can lead to substance abuse. Parents also will receive information twice monthly about how they can help keep their children drug free.

via LifeSkills Training: News Detail.


Ohio Grants Target Anti-Drug Programs For Kids

April 8, 2014

A Licking County agency will receive $62,448 to provide the LifeSkills Training program to all 9th-grade students in Newark City Schools. Pathways of Central Ohio will also deliver the evidenced-based curriculum to students in six other Licking County schools.

Kristin McCloud, executive director of Pathways of Central Ohio says the curriculum focuses on relationships and self-esteem.

via LifeSkills Training: News Detail.


Get Involved in National Prevention Week

April 3, 2014

Get Involved in SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week 2014: May 18 to 24!

National Prevention Week is a SAMHSA-supported annual health observance dedicated to increasing public awareness of, and action around, substance abuse and mental health issues. This observance is powered by communities nationwide that host prevention-themed events to:

  • Increase the visibility of behavioral health and the benefits of prevention.
  • Provide a forum to educate the public.
  • Create opportunities for networking and collaboration.

via Road to Recovery: Get Involved in National Prevention Week.


ASCD and HHS/CDC Announce Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child Model

April 2, 2014

ASCD, a global community dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and leading, announced today the new Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model that is recommended as a strategy for improving students’ health and learning in our schools. Developed by ASCD and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with key leaders from education, public health, and school health fields, the new model combines and builds on elements of the traditional coordinated school health approach and the whole child framework to strengthen a unified and collaborative approach to learning and health.

A whole child approach, which ensures that each student is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged, sets the standard for comprehensive, sustainable school improvement and provides for long-term student success. The new WSCC model responds to the call for greater alignment, integration, and collaboration between education and health to improve each child’s cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development.

The model incorporates the components of an effective school health program and the tenets of the whole child approach to education to address the symbiotic relationship between learning and health. In doing so, the model continues the focus of the traditional coordinated school health approach but aligns it with the structure, framework, and objectives of education. This is showcased by the expanded components focusing additional attention on the social and emotional climate of the school and classroom environments and the pivotal role that community involvement plays in the growth and development of our youth.

The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model focuses its attention on the child, emphasizing a schoolwide approach and acknowledging learning, health, and the school as being a part and reflection of the local community. Because they have contact with 95 percent of U.S. children ages 5–17, schools are the primary institution responsible for childhood development, after the family. It is essential that schools have an effective and comprehensive school health model in place during these critical years of social, psychological, physical, and intellectual development.

Whereas the traditional coordinated school health model contained eight components, the WSCC contains 10, expanding Health and Safe School Environment and Family/Community Involvement into four distinct components:

-Social and Emotional Climate

-Physical Environment

-Family Engagement

-Community Involvement

This change marks the need for greater emphasis on both the psychosocial and physical environment as well as the ever-increasing roles that community agencies and families must play. Finally, this new model also addresses the need to engage students as active participants in their learning and health.

CDC will be integrating this new model into its school health initiatives, placing ASCD’s whole child framework at the center of health and education alignment in school settings. For more information about CDC’s school health initiatives, visit www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth.

For more information about ASCD’s Whole Child Initiative, visit www.ascd.org/wholechild. To find out about ASCD’s focus on integrating learning and health visit www.ascd.org/learningandhealth. You can also find out more about ASCD’s other programs, products, services and memberships at www.ascd.org.


LifeSkills Training Works with Italian Youth

April 1, 2014

In the final part of this 5-part video series, Dr. Velasco describes her team’s evaluation methods and briefly summarizes one-year results showing that LifeSkills Training works with Italian youth. Visit http://www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.

The series focuses on implementation of the Botvin Life Skills Training drug abuse prevention program with Italian youth.

 


What Parents and Teachers in Italy REALLY think of LifeSkills Training

March 31, 2014

In Part 4 of this 5-part series, Dr. Veronica Velasco talks about the positive reaction to the Botvin LifeSkills Training program by Italian parents and teachers. Visit http://www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.

This 5-part series focuses on implementation of the Life Skills Training drug abuse prevention program with Italian youth.


Implementing LifeSkills Training in Milan

March 28, 2014

In Part 3 of this 5-part series, Dr. Veronica Velasco describes the implementation of Botvin LifeSkills Training with 100 classes from over 20 schools in Milan and the lessons learned by her project team. Visit http://www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.


“Technical Difficulties”

March 27, 2014

Hi everyone!  Thanks for bearing with us as our website http://www.lifeskillstraining.com is experiencing technical difficulties.  We are working hard to get it back up.  In the meantime, if you have any questions about the program, please email us at lstinfo@nhpamail.com or you can call us at 800-293-4969.

thanks!

LifeSkills Training Team :)


Translating and Adapting LifeSkills Training for Italian Youth

March 27, 2014

In Part 2 of this 5-part series, Dr. Veronica Velasco and Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin discuss the process of translating and adapting the LifeSkills Training program to the Italian culture. Visit http://www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.


Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin and Dr. Veronica Velasco discuss LifeSkills Training in Italy

March 26, 2014

This 5-part series focuses on implementation of the Botvin Life Skills Training drug abuse prevention program with Italian youth. In Part 1, Dr. Gil Botvin, developer of the LST program, discusses advances in drug abuse prevention and the LST project in Italy. Dr. Veronica Velasco, one of the project leaders, describes the problem of drug abuse in Italy and why they chose LST. Visit http://www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.


San Diego teachers learn how to teach LifeSkills Training Program

March 25, 2014

San Diego teachers learn how to teach LifeSkills Training Program

High School teachers in San Diego at a workshop last week learning how to implement the LifeSkills Training program.


Applications Now Being Accepted for 2014 National Exemplary Awards | CADCA

March 24, 2014

Did your organization implement an exceptional evidence-based strategy  or program to address substance abuse? Then, apply for the 2014 National Exemplary Awards for Innovative Substance Abuse Prevention Programs, Practices, and Policies  (2014 Exemplary Awards), sponsored by the National Association of State  Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Inc. (NASADAD) and the National  Prevention Network (NPN).

The 2014 Exemplary Awards recognize exceptional substance abuse efforts, to include programs, policies and practices (henceforth to be referred to as “programs”).  They are intended to showcase “grassroots,” evidence-based substance abuse prevention programs and strategies that have been evaluated and may be replicated by others. Organizations that have implemented programs resulting in specific changes or outcomes—at the individual, program, or community levels—are encouraged to respond to this Call for Applications.

The 2014 Exemplary Awards recipients will be recognized at the National Prevention Network’s annual Prevention Research Conference in Hartford, Connecticut, September 15-18, 2014.

via Applications Now Being Accepted for 2014 National Exemplary Awards | CADCA.


6 Lessons for Transitioning to a New Chapter in Life

March 20, 2014

Making the transition to college or even the workforce can be challenging. New places, new faces, and new opportunities can bring about some anxious or scary feelings of the unknown. LifeSkills Training Transitions helps people navigating the progression into a new chapter in their life. This 6-lesson program helps participants achieve competency in the skills that are key to success:

  1. Goal-settingTransitions-for-www
  2. Effective communication
  3. Managing stress
  4. Decision-making
  5. Managing time and money
  6. Building relationships

If you want to learn more about how to teach this program, register for our online training workshop on April 2nd. Email training@nhpamail.com for more info.

via Botvin LifeSkills Training: Transitions.


Convenience Store Group Encourages Members Not to Sell E-Cigs to Youth

March 19, 2014

The National Association of Convenience Stores is urging its members not to sell e-cigarettes to minors, the Associated Press reports. The group represents more than 151,280 convenience stores.

The group says e-cigarettes should be treated like other age-restricted tobacco products. In a statement, the group notes convenience stores are the largest retail channel for e-cigarette sales, with overall sales of almost $540 million last year.

via APNewsBreak: Retail Group Urges Youth E-Cig Ban – ABC News.


Attorneys General to Major Retailers: Stop Selling Tobacco Products

March 18, 2014

The attorneys general of 28 states and territories are urging major retailers to follow the lead of CVS Caremark and stop selling tobacco products. They sent letters to Rite Aid, Walgreens, Kroger, Safeway and Walmart, which are among the nation’s biggest pharmacy retailers.

via Attorneys General to Major Retailers: Stop Selling Tobacco Products | The Partnership at Drugfree.org.


Prevention: The Return on Investment

March 17, 2014

Investing in prevention is an economic no-brainer, according to recent study. A report released by the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) determined that communities will reap dramatic savings by using drug abuse and violence programs proven to be effective. One such program, the top-rated Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program, was found to produce a $38 benefit for every dollar invested. The report presented the results of an extensive economic analysis of a number of different programs, carefully weighing the costs and benefits of the programs assessed. LST had the highest return on investment for the school-based prevention programs studied.

In April 2012, Washington State Institute for Public Policy updated their report entitled “Return on Investment: Evidence-Based Options to Improve Statewide Outcomes.”The report, similar to an investment advisor’s “buy-sell” list, contains current recommendations on policy options that can give taxpayers a good return on their investment (“buys”), as well as those that apparently cannot (“sells”). Investing in LST represents a 38-to-1 return to communities in terms of reduced corrections costs, welfare and social services burden, drug and mental health treatment; and increased employment and tax revenue.

via Cost-Benefit Studies.


LifeSkills Training: Funding Opportunities

March 14, 2014

The LifeSkills Training website provides a listing of funding opportunities that may be applicable to fund the program.  Please click on each title for detailed information on each funding opportunity.

via LifeSkills Training: Funding Opportunities.

Preparing grant applications can be challenging.  LifeSkills Training offers several grant application tools to help you in applying for local, state, and federal funding.
LifeSkills Training Grant Writing Resources
Grant Writing Aid
This document offers information, resources, and suggestions to sites that are applying funding to implement the LifeSkills Training program. Information in this document is not intended to be used as a template for writing a proposal. Rather, information should be viewed as suggestions and examples that can be used to construct a strong proposal.
LST Grant Writing Template
Incorporating key program information into your grant application is very important. This valuable template outlines key information on the LifeSkills Training program you will need to incorporate into your grant application.
Federal Grant Writing Resources
EPA Federal Grant Writing Tutorial

Report to Congress on the Prevention and Reduction of Underage Drinking 2013|SAMHSA

March 13, 2014

The 2013 Report to Congress on the Prevention and Reduction of Underage Drinking includes readily accessible reviews of the latest research on the extent of underage drinking and problems associated with it. According to the report, “Alcohol remains the most widely used substance of abuse among America’s youth,” which has “profound negative consequences for underage drinkers, their families, their communities, and society as a whole.”

via Report to Congress on the Prevention and Reduction of Underage Drinking 2013|SAMHSA.


Which prevention programmes work best for prescription drug misuse? | Prevention Hub

March 10, 2014

This six year study of 11,000 teenagers aimed to measure the success and cost-effectiveness of prescription drug abuse prevention efforts. Researchers at Duke and Pennsylvania State universities found huge differences in the effectiveness of different programmes. As Prevention Hub has reported in several other prevention stories, the best results came from pairing a school-based programme with a home-based intervention. Given the role of home in this problem, it is maybe unsurprising that school based programmes alone were generally ineffective, although the authors highlight success for the  LifeSkills Training program, which teaches social skills that build competence and encourage assertiveness. This program was also the most cost-effective…

via Which prevention programmes work best for prescription drug misuse? | Prevention Hub.


To Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse, Involve the School and Family

March 7, 2014

The illegal use of prescription drugs is on the rise, but efforts to stop prescription drug abuse through legislation and policing have proven ineffective. New research may offer some keys to solving this problem.

As more people misuse prescription drugs, the old paradigm of interdiction, or attempting to stop the importation of drugs, is becoming less relevant. We need new strategies in our society…

via To Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse, Involve the School and Family.


LifeSkills Training: Program Providers

August 4, 2014

In order to be optimally effective, the Botvin LifeSkills Training program should be implemented carefully and completely. Just as important as what is being taught is how the program is taught.

To maximize effectiveness, choose wisely your:
• Provider
• Setting

LifeSkills Training has been successfully implemented by a variety of program providers including: teachers, counselors, prevention specialists, health professionals, social workers, community youth educators, law enforcement officers, and even older peer leaders

via LifeSkills Training: Program Providers.


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