Drug-Free Community (DFC) Funding

January 13, 2017

The Fiscal Year 2017 Drug-Free Community (DFC) Funding Opportunity Announcement is now available online, along with pre-application workshops to help you submit the application in full by the deadline.dfc_infographic

Applicants can either be coalitions who have never received DFC funding (Year 1) or current recipients applying for a second cycle of five years of funding (Year 6) or former recipients who experienced a lapse in funding during a five-year cycle.

DFC Support Program is a federal grant program that provides funding to community-based coalitions that organize to prevent youth substance use. Since the passage of the DFC Act in 1997, the DFC Program has funded more than 2,000 coalitions and currently mobilizes nearly 9,000 community volunteers across the country. The philosophy behind the DFC Program is that local drug problems require local solutions.

Coalitions who have never received DFC funding can apply using this application and coalitions who have received DFC funding in the past should use this application. More information about the application is available on the ONDCP website.

Want hands-on help with your application? Register for a pre-application workshop!

• Wednesday, January 18: Flagstaff, AZ

• Tuesday, January 24: Birmingham, AL

• Thursday, January 26: Dallas, TX

• Friday, February 10: National Harbor, MD (at CADCA’s National Leadership Forum)

Application deadline is 3/15/17


Attention Massachusetts: Tune into “Mass Appeal” this Wednesday, 1/11 at 11am

January 9, 2017

Excited to share the news!

The Botvin Lifeskills Training Program will be featured on the daily hour-long lifestyle program Mass Appeal on WWLP this Wednesday 1/11 between 11am-12pm.

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Tune in to watch Kat Allen from the Communities that Care Coalition, a Partnership for Youth Program of the Franklin Regional Council of Governments, and Kate Blair from the Frontier Regional School in Deerfield as they discuss the successes of implementing Lifeskills Training to help reduce teen drug use in their community.

Studies show that students who go through this program are much less likely to engage in drugs and other forms of dangerous behaviors later in life. Tobacco use was also shown to be reduced by 87% and alcohol use by 60%.

The LifeSkills Training program involves a set curriculum with interactions and role-plays between teachers and students. The teachers have been using the curriculum for more than a year now, and are seeing the results.


Community Foundation accepting applications from youth-focused substance abuse programs

January 2, 2017

The John M. Drogosz Youth Substance Abuse Prevention/Treatment Memorial Fund, a component fund of the Freeport Community Foundation, is accepting applications from youth-focused substance abuse programs.

The fund supports educational, prevention, and/or substance abuse treatment programs focused on helping youth age 21 or younger in Freeport, Illinois. Grant amounts vary on a project-by-project basis.

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US Coins

To be eligible, organizations must have 501(c)(3) status. In addition, the programs or activities for which they seek support must focus on the education, prevention, and/or treatment of substance abuse in youth (defined as 21 or younger) in Freeport.

See the Freeport Community Foundation website for complete program guidelines and application instructions.

Application deadline is 6/1/17


Utah’s Opioid Crisis Took Center Stage at Ogden Summit

December 30, 2016

The data surrounding prescription opioid abuse in Utah is staggering.

The Beehive State was fourth in the nation for prescription opioid overdose deaths between 2012 and 2014, according to the Utah Department of Health. In 2014, an average of 24 Utah adults died every month as a result of prescription opioid overdoses.

Drug poisoning is the leading cause of death in Utah — more deadly than falls, car crashes and gun deaths.rx

And to compound things, there are more than 7,000 opioid prescriptions filled in Utah every day, and physical dependence on those prescriptions can occur within seven days of use.

The Weber County-sponsored Utah Prevention Summit, held at the Ogden Eccles Conference Center, highlighted substance abuse prevention services in Utah and included a presentation on the state’s opioid crisis.

Friday’s summit also featured presentations from East Coast substance abuse experts Dr. Gil Botvin and Kat Allen.

Dr. Botvin is the developer of a student tobacco, alcohol and drug abuse prevention program called Life Skills Training. He spoke Friday about the importance of rigorously tested, evidence-based prevention programs.

Botvin said it’s necessary to go beyond just teaching information and principles about the dangers of drug abuse. He says students must learn skills related to resisting social pressure, developing self-confidence, coping with stress and anxiety, and increasing knowledge of the immediate consequences of substance abuse.


Delaware to Launch Addiction Prevention Campaign in 2017

December 28, 2016

Drugs EcstacyDelaware ranks No. 1 for the rate at which doctors prescribe high-dose opioids compared to the rest of the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It’s a statistic that is both alarming to state officials and indicative of a larger problem in Delaware, where more than 100 people continue to die of drug overdoses each year.

It’s also one of the many reasons the state Division of Public Health will launch a $250,000 educational community outreach campaign in early 2017 aimed at prescribers, residents and the community at large to fight opioid addiction on the front lines.

The state Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, which the Division of Public Health works closely with, will also use just over $2 million per year for the next two years in federal grants to work on primary prevention and education regarding the misuse of prescription drugs, according to the state.

Drug overdose deaths have continued to grow, and experts openly denounce “scared straight” tactics often used in this programming. The state is actively reviewing “LifeSkills Training,” a school-based program delivered over 3 years that is considered an evidence-based approach to educating and preventing addiction. The program was also cited in the Surgeon General’s report released last month.

This education is imperative, as 90 Delawareans have died of fentanyl overdoses in the first nine months of the year. That doesn’t include the numerous others who have died of fatal heroin overdoses and the hundreds who have been jailed for dealing and using drugs.

More Information: Read full article


Alcohol Fund Advisory accepting Grant Applications

December 27, 2016

Alcohol-Ads-Still-Reach-too-Many-Teens-2The Alcohol Fund Advisory Committee gives particular consideration to applicants that propose to make a difference in the following categories: treatment, problem identification and referral; alternatives and activities; community-based change efforts; environmental approaches; prevention education and information dissemination.

The state of Kansas provides to cities and counties receipts generated from a special tax on liquor sales. A third of these receipts can be used for general government purposes, a third can be credited to parks and recreation, and a third is devoted to alcohol and drug treatment or prevention.

To manage the portion of the funds devoted to alcohol and drug treatment or prevention, the city of Garden City and Finney County empower an Alcohol Fund Advisory Committee (AFAC) to solicit applications and make recommendations for use of the local funds. AFAC distributes these funds in a manner that enables the group to monitor effectiveness. Applicants are expected to provide a description of how requested funds will be used and provide documentation throughout the year as to success in fulfilling their commitment.

Any person, civic group, not-for-profit agency or private entity will be considered for receiving funds, except for those that would qualify for the AFAC funds, Arts Grant funds, and those applicants that have the ability to levy funds.

For more details about any of these programs, or for applications, visit  Applications will be accepted until 4 p.m. Feb. 17. Mail or hand-deliver applications to: Jennifer Cunningham, Assistant City Manager, 301 N. Eighth, Garden City, KS 67846. If you have other questions, call Cunningham at (620) 276-1157.

Application deadline is 2/17/17

Visit http://www.gctelegram.com/news/local/city-accepting-applications-for-grant-programs/article_10958906-2d8d-5edb-9b26-3a91b656339f.html for more info


Student Survey: Alcohol Use Down in Cambria

December 26, 2016

Survey results of 4,100 Cambria County, PA students indicate students aren’t drinking alcohol as much as they were in 2013, but on the other hand, they indicate parent disapproval of alcohol and drug use erodes from sixth grade to 12th grade.

The Cambria County Prevention Coalition has been analyzing results of the 2015 Pennsylvania Youth Survey,’ or PAYS.

The analysis suggests parents should safely dispose of prescription pills because they are not perceived as risky by some students. A majority of students who said they experimented with prescription pills said they found them at home.

PCCDLogo-2CEvery two years the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency conducts a survey of students in sixth, eighth, 10th and 12th grades statewide to learn about their behavior, attitudes and knowledge concerning alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The 2015 Pennsylvania Youth Survey, or PAYS, was taken by about 4,100 students from all 14 school districts in Cambria County.

Encouraged by a decline in alcohol and tobacco use, coalition members credited an evidence-based prevention program implemented in Cambria schools.

Sean Simler, research and data analyst for the United Way Laurel Highlands, said the Botvin LifeSkills Training program has been implemented in all middle school curriculum across Cambria and Somerset counties.

Read full article


Community Foundation accepting grant applications for Youth Advisory Council and Tobacco Grants

December 23, 2016

teen-smokingCommunity Foundation for Northeast Michigan is accepting grant applications for the winter 2017 grant cycles of its Community Impact, Youth Advisory Council and Tobacco Grants. The deadline for all three grant opportunities is Jan. 16, 2017.

Eligibility: All non-profit agencies with a 501(c)(3) IRS designation, schools, churches (for non-religious purposes) and government agencies in the counties of Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Presque Isle counties are invited to apply.

  • Community Impact Grants are for a broad range of projects and programs. The maximum grant request amount is $5,000. Mini-grants of up to $1,000 are also available.
  • Youth Advisory Council Grants are for projects benefiting youth under the age of 18. The maximum request amount for YAC Grants is $2,500. Mini-grants of up to $500 are available as well.
  • Tobacco Grants are for projects and programs that address tobacco-related issues including smoking prevention and cessation programs. Applicants may request up to $3,000 through the Tobacco Grant.

Applications are available at http://www.cfnem.org where they may be completed online and submitted via email, or printed for completion. If applications are mailed, they must be postmarked by the grant deadline date and sent to the CFNEM office at P.O. Box 495, Alpena, MI 49707.

Applicants may also call the Community Foundation office for more information at 1-877-354-6881.

Application deadline is 1/16/17

Visit http://www.cfnem.org/ for more info


Surgeon General names Botvin LifeSkills Training to Prevent Substance Use

December 16, 2016

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Earlier this month, the U.S. Surgeon General released a new report on the addiction epidemic in this country asking communities to focus on evidence-based prevention. The report titled Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health named the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program as an effective prevention program for adolescents aged 10 to 18.

rxAccording to the report, effective prevention programs can delay early use, stop the progression to addiction, and avoid the need for treatment. After an extensive review of published research studies, the Surgeon General identified LST as a prevention program that successfully reduces the number of people who start using alcohol or drugs.  “One well-researched and widely used program is LifeSkills Training, a school-based program delivered over 3 years. Research has shown that this training delayed early use of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances…”

Over 30 years of rigorous research show LST as a method for preventing multiple problems—such as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug abuse, as well as delinquency and violence—using a single prevention program.  The centerpiece of the LST strategy is a curriculum designed to be taught by classroom teachers, health educators, prevention specialists, or student peer leaders.

“We know that effective prevention programs can produce a powerful public health benefit by reducing tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use. But this report also shows that evidence-based programs are highly underutilized,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College and developer of the LST program. “Increased attention must be given to promoting the use of programs that work. A relatively small upfront investment in a proven prevention program such as LST can yield tremendous health and economic benefits.”

About Botvin LifeSkills Training      

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) is a highly acclaimed, evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program. LST has been extensively tested and proven to reduce tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use by as much as 80%. Long-term follow-up studies show that it produces prevention effects that are durable and long-lasting. Visit http://www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.

Contact:

Paulina Kalaj

Director, Communications & Media Relations

National Health Promotion Associates

1-800-293-4969 ext. 214

 


Community Foundation announces grant opportunities

December 16, 2016

Community Foundation for Northeast Michigan is accepting grant applications for the winter 2017 grant cycles of its Community Impact, Youth Advisory Council and Tobacco Grants. 

Eligibility: All non-profit agencies with a 501(c)(3) IRS designation, schools, churches (for non-religious purposes) and government agencies in the counties of Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Presque Isle counties are invited to apply.

  • Community Impact Grants are for a broad range of projects and programs. The maximum grant request amount is $5,000. Mini-grants of up to $1,000 are also available.
  • Youth Advisory Council Grants are for projects benefiting youth under the age of 18. The maximum request amount for YAC Grants is $2,500. Mini-grants of up to $500 are available as well.
  • Tobacco Grants are for projects and programs that address tobacco-related issues including smoking prevention and cessation programs. Applicants may request up to $3,000 through the Tobacco Grant.

Applications are available at http://www.cfnem.org. Applicants may also call the Community Foundation office for more information at 1-877-354-6881.

Deadline: The deadline for all three grant opportunities is Jan. 16, 2017.


Substance Abuse Funding Alert / Webinar

December 13, 2016

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) –  An evidence-based, effective program for reducing substance abuse

Are you applying for the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD)’s Substance Abuse Education Demand Reduction (SAEDR) Funds? Did you know that LST Middle School has proven to reduce prescription drug and opioid misuse?   The goal of the SAEDR grant is to reduce substance abuse and reduce substance abuse behavior.  LST is universal program that can support county and local opioid task forces that are seeking evidence-based, research-validated prevention program that has been proven to work. rx

Grant Opportunity:  Substance Abuse Demand Reduction (SAEDR) Category One Funds

Application Deadline:  December 23, 2016

If your plans includes prevention education for youth in your community and schools, then LST should be on your list.

Agency Details:   The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency’s (PCCD) Office of Criminal Justice System Improvements

Presentation Details: In this informative webinar, we seek to provide prospective applicants with an understanding of how the LST program can meet the grant objectives and anticipated impacts expected as part of the funding.  The presenter will introduce information related to skill-building and activities proven to reduce abuse among youth related to alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, as well as prescription drug and opioid misuse.  Participants review and discuss implementation options and fidelity guidelines to ensure that applicants understand how the LST program can fit into their existing or projected implementation plans.

Duration:  45 – 60 minutes

Format:  Webinar

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 12 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register for this webinar:   Thursday, December 15th at 3pm ET   After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

(Note:  NHPA or Botvin LST is not the funding agency for this grant.  This presentation is specifically designed for agencies or task forces interested in applying for the PCCD SAEDR Category One grant.  Any questions related to the application process or criteria should be directed to the appropriate parties per their instructions in the information packet.)

 


Senate Passes Legislation to Reauthorize STOP Act, Provide $1 Billion for Combating Opioid Crisis

December 8, 2016

The U.S. Senate has just voted in an overwhelming fashion to pass the 21 st Century Cures Act, a landmark piece of legislation that includes a reauthorization of the Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking (STOP) Act and provides $1 billion over two years for grants to states to tackle the opioid crisis in a comprehensive manner that includes prevention strategies. The bill will now go to the President’s desk, where he has already indicated that he will sign it into law.

The 21 st Century Cures Act includes $1 billion over two years for grants to States to tackle the opioid crisis in a comprehensive manner that specifically includes prevention, treatment, Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP), and prescriber training. Prevention is a necessary and critical component of any comprehensive response to the opioids crisis, and these grants will be immensely helpful for States to tackle their local overdose emergencies.


Schools Ramping Up Opioid Abuse Program – WSJ

December 2, 2016

Many U.S. schools are ramping up campaigns to prevent opioid abuse among students as evidence mounts of a growing problem.

In some regions, schools are teaching a substance-abuse-prevention program developed at Cornell University to students as young as fourth grade.


Dr. Botvin Keynotes International Congress in Barcelona

November 29, 2016

Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin delivered the keynote address at the 2nd International Congress of Clinical and Health Psychology on Children and Adolescents on November 17, 2016, in Barcelona. More than 700 participants from 50 countries gathered for the scientific meeting hosted by AITANA, a research group from the Department of Health Psychology at Miguel Hernández University in Elche, Spain.

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Clinical and health psychologists from all over the world learned what makes the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program the top-rated prevention program in the United States.  Dr. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College, is an internationally renowned prevention expert and developer of the highly acclaimed LST substance abuse and violence prevention program.

In his keynote, Dr. Botvin described the LST prevention approach, explained its theory, and summarized over 30 years of rigorous research documenting its effectiveness. He also discussed the unique benefits of LST as a method for preventing multiple problems—such as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug abuse, as well as opioid misuse, violence, and delinquency—using a single prevention approach.  The centerpiece of the LST strategy is a curriculum designed to be taught by classroom teachers, health educators, prevention specialists, or student peer leaders.

“It was a great honor and privilege to visit Barcelona and participate in a conference committed to improving the health and well-being of the world youth,” said Dr. Botvin. “I also want to commend AITANA for their support of the conference and dedication to life skills education.”


Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health

November 28, 2016

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration announced the release of Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. This landmark report was developed as a collaboration between SAMHSA and the Office of the Surgeon General.

Recently, the U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy published a landmark report on a health crisis affecting every community in our country. Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health is a comprehensive review of the science of substance use, misuse, and disorders. The report is available online at Addiction.SurgeonGeneral.gov.   


WSJ: Schools Step Up Efforts to Fight Opioid Abuse

November 15, 2016
On Friday The Wall Street Journal featured an article and video highlighting the LifeSkills Training program. See below for the full article link and click the image to watch an interview with program developer Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin. 

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wsjMany U.S. schools are ramping up campaigns to prevent opioid abuse among students as evidence mounts of a growing problem.

Some are inviting pharmacists to schools to convey the dangers of prescription pills. Others are offering emergency counseling via text message. In some regions, schools are teaching a substance-abuse-prevention program developed at Cornell University to students as young as fourth grade… Click to read full article


National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Rates School Safety Programs 

November 7, 2016

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has released “Find School Safety Programs on CrimeSolutions.gov.” This short video discusses how school, social services, and agencies can use the CrimeSolutions.gov clearinghouse to find evidence-based programs and practices that can improve school safety. The video also addresses the lack of strong evaluations of school safety programs that schools are implementing and investing in and how this presents an opportunity for research. pic.png

CrimeSolutions.gov includes almost 300 programs and practices on juvenile topics that are rated as Effective, Promising, or No Effects. Of the mere 21% rated as Effective, the Botvin LifeSkills Training program leads the way with multiple studies showing it effects on violence and delinquency prevention.

CrimeSolutions.gov programs can also be found on the U.S. Department of Justice’s, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s Model Programs Guide along with other evidence-based resources.

 


Violence Prevention: How necessary is it?

November 2, 2016

Rates of school violence in K-12 schools in the US are startling. A 2014 study found that the number of youth homicide victims could fill 89 school buses annually. And each year, the number of youth hospitalized for assault-related injuries is high enough to fill every seat within 9 football stadiums. These alarming statistics call for better prevention programs to decrease youth violence.violence.jpg

Many schools engage in secondary prevention methods such as metal detectors and police intervention programs. A literature review conducted by Hankin and Hertz (2011), however, concluded there were insufficient data to determine whether metal detectors were effective in reducing violence among adolescents in middle and high schools. And though many states have their own violence prevention programs such as the Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) and Law-Related Education (L.R.E.), other programs such as Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) have been shown to yield better results.

The CDC recommends evidence-based programs such as LST because of their proven effectiveness in reducing violence and drug use. A 2006 study conducted in New York City  found significant reduction in violence and delinquency amongst students who received LST compared to students who received standard health education provided by New York City public schools. Results from a 3-month follow up indicated that those who received the LST intervention (2,734 students) showed a 25.6% decrease in physical aggression compared to those who did not (2,484 students).

National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) is currently conducting research on substance and violence prevention by evaluating LST in different cohort settings. One of the most popular and successful project conducted by NHPA is the middle school program that teaches self-management skills, general social skills, and drug resistance skills to 6-9th graders. The program is recognized by organizations such as the National Institute of Health, U.S. Department of Education, the National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practice, and many more. For more information on the program, click here.

References:

Botvin, G. J., Griffin, K. W.,Nichols, T. R. (2006). Preventing youth violence and delinquency through a universal school-based prevention approach. Prevention Science, 7, 403-408. 

Center for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] (2016). Youth violence: Risk and protective factors. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/riskprotectivefactors.html

David-Ferdon C, Simon TR. (2014). Taking Action to Prevent Youth Violence: A Companion Guide to Preventing Youth Violence: Opportunities for Action. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/pdf/opportunities-for-action-companion-guide.pdf

Gottfredson, D. C. (n.d.). Chapter 5 (R. Weissberg, Ed.). Retrieved October 31, 2016, from https://www.ncjrs.gov/works/chapter5.htm

Washington State Institute for Public Policy [WSIP] (2014). Cost-benefits results. Retrieved from: http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/BenefitCost.

Contributing Writer: Kevin Ng recently received a Bachelor of Science in Health Science and Public Health from Stony Brook University.


Top Tips on How to Write a Winning Grant Application

October 27, 2016
Join us for a webinar on  Thursday, November 3rd at 1pm PT.
 
This informative webinar will explore successful grant-writing tips and strategies that incorporate the Botvin  LifeSkills Training  program into the TUPE grant application. Our goal is to help you be as informed as possible about the grant application process while supporting the inclusion of our program as a part of your comprehensive submission.
 
Space is limited. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.
California Department of Education’s  TUPE funds support health education efforts aimed at the prevention and reduction of tobacco use by youth and is funded through a competitive application process. Funding consideration is based on projects that propose to implement research-validated prevention programs like LifeSkills Training for the general student population.
Eligible Applicants: D istricts, charter schools, consortium leads, and county offices of education that serve students in grades 6-12.
Deadline: 12/16/16

ATOD Funding Alert: applications due 11/11   

October 21, 2016
Henderson County KY ASAP Local Board Accepting  Mini-Grant Applications

The Henderson County Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy will award mini-grants ranging from $2,000 – $4,000 to local agencies and groups that help support and grow Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug prevention, treatment, and enforcement programs throughout the community.

The Henderson County KY ASAP Local Board will accept written proposals from applicants detailing how they would utilize grant funding.

Any local ATOD group is welcome to apply by Nov. 11, 2016. To receive a copy of the request for proposal for the Henderson County KY ASAP local board mini grant, please contact Shawna Evans at Henderson County High School, 2424 Zion Road Henderson, Ky. 42420, (270) 831-8867, or by email at shawna.evans@henderson.kyschools.us.

 Preparing grant applications can be a bit challenging. Botvin LifeSkills Training offers several grant application tools to help you in applying for local, state, and federal funding.

How Computer Games in the Classroom Can Teach Rx Drug Abuse Prevention

October 18, 2016

The recreational use of prescription pain relievers, stimulants and sedatives has become one of the most prevalent forms of drug abuse among youth in the United States  (World Drugs Report, 2012). This is driven primarily by an increased availability of prescription drugs. Between 1991 and 2010 prescriptions for opioids increased by 134 million (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2011). The U.S. population has only grown by 65 million in the same amount of time, meaning for each person born two opioid scripts were administered.

There is a misconception that prescription medication is safe to takpille because a doctor has prescribed it. This can be partially attributed to the decrease in perceived harmfulness of narcotics, which has decreased 2 percent from 2010 to 2012 (Klisch, Bowling, Miller & Ramos, 2013). Researchers in the prevention field have been exploring different ways to ensure adolescents know the risks of recreational prescription drug abuse.

Incorporating computer games and e-learning teaching methods have become popular in U.S. classrooms, as they increase engagement and reflect the learning style of a more digitally savvy generation (Klisch, Bowling, Miller, & Ramos, 2013).  In a study conducted by Klisch and colleagues, 179 students played educational games teaching them about prescription drugs and prescription drug abuse. Increased awareness of the dangers associated with prescription drugs was found among students who played these computer games. A game-based e-learning program developed by Children’s Health Education Center was also associated with decreased alcohol, tobacco and other drug use as well as a decrease in misconceptions about the risks of substance abuse (Schweizer, Hayseltt, Bansal, Ronco & Schafer, 2014).

National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA), an internationally renowned leader in the prevention field, is currently creating new e-learning modules on prescription drug abuse for adolescents. Based on Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST), the goal of this program is to bring attention to the dangers of prescription drug abuse and misuse while teaching students skills to refuse them. This adaptation will educate youth on healthy behavioral practices as well as help to deter them from engaging in dangerous health behaviors.

Sources: World Health Organization, (2012) World Drugs Report. New York: United Nations Offices on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC).

U.S Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1991 (111th edition). Washington, DC.

Klisch, Y., Bowling, K. G., Miller, L. M., & Ramos, M. A. (2013). The impact of science education games on prescription drug abuse attitudes among teens: A case study. Journal of Drug Education43(3), 255-275.

Schweizer, H., Hayslett, C., Bansal, N., Ronco, S., & Schafer, R. (2014). Effective alcohol, tobacco and other drug intervention and prevention using online game-based, e-learning: an evidence-informed program that works.International journal on e-learning13(3), 335-373.

Contributing Writer: Anthony Montemarano is pursuing both a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Master of Arts in Industrial/Organization Psychology at Iona College.

 


Professional Development workshop: “Teaching Marijuana Prevention”

October 5, 2016

Join us for this 2-part professional development workshop on 11/14 & 11/18 where we will:

  • Examine trends in the social & legal acceptance of marijuana in the US
  • Consider effective strategies in responding to learners
  • Develop specific responses to challenging questions that may arise in school and community education settings

Space is limited. Click here to register> http://tinyurl.com/jfug5zkNHPA MJ 11.14&18.16-1.jpg


LifeSkills Training webinars for all levels. Space is limited. Register early!

September 21, 2016
Are you ready for the new school year? Join us on a webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…
Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

Palm SpringsWe’re excited to offer a series of webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

NEW DATES ADDED

Elementary Program – Tuesday, 10/4 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/hhezd5n

Middle School – Wednesday, 10/5 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/hxpjzws

High School Program – Thursday, 10/6 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/jtatbfq

Transitions Program – Friday, 10/7 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/h7wpenl

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

 

There’s still time to register: Training of Trainers (TOT) Workshop, 10/27-10/28

September 9, 2016

tot

This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct LST workshops for your organization.  Eligibility limited to those who complete an LST workshop and implement the program for at least one full semester.

Greater NYC Area: October 27 – 28, 2016*

 *Space is limited; please register early.


ONDCP announces grants for nearly 700 communities to prevent youth substance use

September 7, 2016

Last week the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), Michael Botticelli, announced $85.9 million in grants for 698 Drug-Free Communities (DFC) Support Programs across the country.  The grants will provide funding to local community coalitions for preventing youth substance use including prescription drugs, marijuana, tobacco, and alcohol. DFC’s 2014 National Evaluation Report showed a significant decrease in past-30-day use of prescription drugs among youth in DFC communities. The report also found a significant decrease in past-30-day use between the first and most recent data reports for alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among middle school and high school youth in DFC communities.

 

Read the White House news release here


Complimentary webinars are back!

August 30, 2016
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Webinar Series: Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

Back by popular demand! We’re offering another series of free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LifeSkills Training program.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

 

LifeSkills Training High School Program (grades 9 or 10)
Tuesday, September 20, 2016       3pm ET – 4pm ET

LifeSkills Training Middle School Program (grades 6 – 8)

Wednesday, September 21, 2016     11am ET – noon ET

 LifeSkills Training Elementary Program (grades 3 – 5)

Wednesday, September 21, 2016   3pm ET – 4pm ET

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

Free webinar, 8/26 at 11am ET

August 25, 2016

There’s still time to register for Friday’s webinar:

Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training Parent Program

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We’re excited to this free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

Space is limited.  Click this link to register


Learn how to kick off the new school year with a free LifeSkills webinar

August 23, 2016

midschool-330-2Are you ready for the new school year?

Join us on a complimentary webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…

Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

We’re excited to offer a series of free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

NEW DATES ADDED

High School Program – Tuesday, 9/20 (3pm ET – 4pm) http://tinyurl.com/jyvtogj

Middle School Program – Wednesday, 9/21 (11am ET -noon) http://tinyurl.com/jz8ruhk

Elementary Program – Wednesday, 9/21 (3pm ET – 4pm) http://tinyurl.com/gvqfm2r

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 


Are you ready for the new school year? Join us on a webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…

August 16, 2016
Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

We’re excited to offer a series of webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

WEBINAR SCHEDULE

Elementary School Program – Monday, 8/22 (11am ET – noon)

Middle School Program – Tuesday, 8/23 (11am ET – noon)

High School Program – Wednesday, 8/24 (11am ET – noon)

Transitions Program – Thursday, 8/25 (11am ET – noon)

Parent Program – Friday, 8/26 (11am ET – noon)

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

 


Head back to school with LifeSkills

August 9, 2016

Promote educational success by teaching students life skills to:

*Enhance self-esteem13912761_10153867532045857_56361278605721723_n

*Develop problem-solving abilities

*Reduce stress and anxiety

*Communicate clearly and resolve conflicts

*Build effective resistance pressures to use tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs

As you head back to school, let us help you plan your health and wellness strategy with one-page overviews of our programs, as well as samples and preview copies of Teacher’s Manuals and Student Guides. We can even host a webinar for you and your staff to learn more about a specific LifeSkills Training program.

Contact us to learn more at lstinfo@nhpamail.com or 800-293-4969


Affirmative Consent Policies and Legislation: “Yes means Yes!” Replacing “No means No!”

July 28, 2016

Sexual assault can happen to anyone regardless of gender, sex, or sexual orientation. Concerns about what constitutes consent are core issues that have risen with the recent increase in high-profile college sexual assault cases at Steubenville, Vanderbilt, and Stanford . A majority of Americans are familiar with the phrase “No means No” in regards to sexual consent. However, it is apparent that not everyone is able to say “no.” In the cases where a victim does not say no, this indicates a lack of consent.consent

There are of course other factors to be considered. State and federal laws are now addressing those factors by removing the previous “No means No” mantra and replacing it with “Yes means Yes,” along with affirmative consent legislation. California, New York, Illinois, and Connecticut have already enacted affirmative consent laws, and 18 other states are currently drafting legislation. Colleges and universities are creating their own affirmative consent policies as they wait for state and federal action.

Currently, affirmative consent policies or laws require:

  • All individuals be conscious
  • All individuals be in a coherent state of mind (i.e., not incapacitated)
  • All individuals actively and equally participate without hesitation
  • There is an absence of coercion, physical force, or threat of physical force
  • There is an enthusiastic yes, to be verbalized

With more of the public attention focusing on the issue of consent, school policies and state and federal laws are being asked to provide clear definitions for affirmative consent. Policies now acknowledge that previous consensual relations do not constitute consent for future sexual acts. During intimacy, each act is acknowledged as separate, and giving consent for one action does not mean the individual is consenting to everything or anything that follows. Most important, policies now clarify that consent can also be withdrawn at any time.

In the act of changing the mantra we use from “No Means No!” to “Yes Means Yes!” we, as a society, are acknowledging that an absence of “No” does not constitute consent. Instead we are reaffirming that consent must be freely given, free of physical force and coercion, as a conscious decision, and enthusiastically.

 

Sources: The Affirmative Consent Project (2016), The New York Times, NPR.

Writer: Melanie Emerson is a recent Health Science graduate of Gettysburg College.  While in college she interned at a women’s health center involving issues related to sexual health, assault, and domestic violence. 


The Truth About Drug Use in Middle School Students

July 27, 2016

rx.jpgPrescription drugs can do a lot to help people with medical conditions and, when used appropriately, they can have a positive impact. Unfortunately, many of these drugs are misused and abused by middle-school-aged youth. According to the 2014 Monitoring the Future Survey, the prevalence of prescription drug use in 8th graders was 1.7% and rose to 4.7% by 12th grade. Thirty-three percent of teens believe it is okay to use prescription drugs for an injury, illness, or physical pain even if it has not been prescribed for them. And in 2012, The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study found that a total of 20% of children have misused or abused a prescription drug before the age of 14. Thus, it is essential to educate students on how not to take drugs prescribed to others.

Prescription drug abuse is many times a result of boredom, a need to escape troubles, or a longing to get high. Social pressures and the overwhelming desire to look “cool” in the eyes of peers can also be a driving factor to engage in these behaviors. Students may urge others to use prescription drugs by saying the common phrase “just try it for fun.” Prescription drug abuse has also become more prevalent because of easy accessibility in the family medicine cabinet. A suggested method of prevention is for parents to talk to their children through times of pressure or unhappiness

National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) is aware of this issue, and is currently creating new sessions on prescription drug abuse for middle-school-aged youth. Based on Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST), the goal of this program is to bring attention to the dangers of prescription drug abuse and misuse while teaching students the skills to refuse them. This adaptation will educate youth on healthy behavioral practices as well as help to deter them from engaging in dangerous health behaviors.

Sources: Monitoring the future national survey results on drug use, 1975–2013: Volume I, secondary school students, University of Utah Health Care.

Writer: Amanda Flower is a rising junior majoring in Public Health at Muhlenberg College

 


Prescription Drug Abuse: Sharing Is Not Caring

July 26, 2016

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine reported that nearly 60 percent of Americans have opioid painkillers that they no longer use. Within this group, 20 percent of participants stated they shared their opioid painkillers with another person.

Those who shared their medication reported that the primary reason for doing so was to help the other person manage their pain. The second most reported reason was because the person asking for the medication did not have the money to pay for the medication or did not have health insurance.

Possession of opioids by people other than the patients to whom they were prescribed is a growing problem, because misusing prescription medication is both physically harmful and illegal.

Because prescription medication is widely used for the treatment of an array of illnesses and disorders, many Americans do not see a problem with sharing their prescription medication to help their friends and family. In an article in the Washington Post, Johns-Hopkins professor Colleen L. Barry calls for a change of public opinion, stating that it is crucial that officials send “a clear-cut public health message that these medications should never be shared in any circumstance.”

The amount of prescription drug abuse is on the rise, especially among adolescents. In a study published by University of Central Florida professor Jason A. Ford, Ph.D., 22 percent of high school students reported nonmedical use of prescription drugs at some point in their lifetime, with 15 percent reporting nonmedical prescription drug abuse within the last year.

Researchers at National Health Promotion Associates are working to develop a Middle School Prescription Drug Abuse program. The program, based on their LifeSkills Training program, aims to prevent drug use by teaching adolescents to use personal self-management skills, social competency skills, and drug refusal skills.  Developers of the program hope to see reductions in abuse by raising awareness at an early age of the potential harm that can come from sharing prescription drugs and providing the tools needed to increase resilience and stimulate personal growth.

The Food and Drug Administration lists proper disposal techniques as one way  of preventing nonmedical prescription drug abuse. To dispose of unused prescription drugs, drop them off at an authorized collector in your community. You can find authorized collectors in your community by calling your local law-enforcement agency or doing an Internet search to locate prescription drug take-back programs.

Sources: DrugFree.org, The Washington Post, Jama Internal Medicine, The Prevention Researcher

Writer: Brooke Dugan is a rising senior majoring in Psychology and Communication at Loyola University Maryland.  


Youth Perception of Marijuana Harm Decreases as Marijuana Concentrate Becomes More Potent

June 30, 2016

Although marijuana use among youth poses a risk to health, nationally only 1 in 5 adolescents perceived it as such. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this misperception among youth exists at a time when marijuana concentrates continue to become more potent, which is cause for public concern. This demonstrates the need to educate young people about various forms of marijuana and their related health consequences and harms.

According to SAMHSA’s Short Report, “State Estimates of Adolescent Marijuana Use and Perceptions of Risk of Harm from Marijuana Use: 2013 and 2014 ,” in the 12 to 17 age group, approximately 1.8 million youth reported using marijuana in the past month.

Health risks associated with youth marijuana use  include poorer education/employment outcomes ,cognitive problemsincreased likelihood of vehicle crashes , and increased addiction risk .

The Drug Enforcement Agency describes marijuana concentrate  as a substance containing highly potent THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of marijuana). This concentrate is often referred to as oil or “710” (“OIL” spelled upside down and backwards). THC levels in this oil could range from 40 to 80 percent, which is about four times stronger than what is found in a “high grade” marijuana plant.

Read more from SAMHSA

SOURCE: US Department of Education 06-29-16 ED’s OSHS PREVENTION NEWS DIGEST-Vol. 12, No. 24


Professional Development Workshop, 7/11

June 29, 2016

Are you prepared to teach marijuana prevention? Join us for this 2-part professional development workshop on 7/11 & 7/15 where we will:

  • Examine trends in the social & legal acceptance of marijuana in the US
  • Consider effective strategies in responding to learners
  • Develop specific responses to challenging questions that may arise in school and community education settings

Space is limited. Click here to register> http://bit.ly/294gvGs

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As Fewer Teens Are Smoking Cigarettes, More Are Using E-Cigs

June 24, 2016

Fewer U.S. teens are smoking regular cigarettes, but more are using e-cigarettes, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Last year, 11 percent of high school students said they smoked a regular cigarette in the last 30 days, while 24 percent said they used e-cigarettes in the past month. The survey found 45 percent of teens said they had tried an e-cigarette at least once.

Current cigarette use has decreased significantly. In 1991, 28 percent of high school students said they smoked cigarettes. The findings come from the National Youth Risk and Behavior Survey, which included more than 15,000 high school students.

“Current cigarette smoking is at an all-time low, which is great news. However, it’s troubling to see that students are engaging in new risk behaviors, such as using e-cigarettes,” CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, said in a news release. “We must continue to invest in programs that help reduce all forms of tobacco use, including e-cigarettes, among youth.”

The survey also found fewer high school students reported illicit use of a prescription drug one or more times. In 2009, 20 percent of teens said they had taken prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription, compared with 17 percent in 2015.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, 06-23-16 ED’s OSHS PREVENTION NEWS DIGEST-Vol. 12, No. 23


Parent Program Leader Training Workshop

June 21, 2016
The LifeSkills Training Parent Program is proven to help families by strengthening family communication.* The program helps keep children from using drugs, is ideal for parenting workshops or self-paced, and is available in Spanish.

Register today and learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program

ParentingClick the link  below for an enrollment form and fax or email it to olt@nhpamail.com

June 29, 2016 – 11am (ET)

Space is limited!

 

 

*A study in the Journal of Child and Family Studies shows that family-based prevention programs can be an effective way to prevent adolescent substance use.

Free webinar: space is limited

June 15, 2016

Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.

LifeSkills Training Middle School program:  Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth

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In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.

 

Duration:  60 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: $0.00 (Space is limited)

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register:  Wednesday June 22nd, 11:30 am ET  After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

 


Get trained before the school year ends

June 7, 2016

In addition to helping kids resist drug, alcohol and tobacco use, the LifeSkills Training  program also effectively supports the reduction of violence and other high-risk behaviors.

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PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

  • Personal Self-Management Skills
  • General Social Skills
  • Drug Resistance Skills

 

 

ONLINE TRAINING WORKSHOP

Learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Middle School Program

New date added! Click to register>>> June 13, 2016 (space is limited)


Summer Schedule: LifeSkills Training Workshops

June 2, 2016

Spaces fill up quickly! Register early to save.

Online Training Workshop –Flexible and convenient; these provider training workshops are accessible from your work or personal computer. Enroll early to save!

6/14 Elementary School Training

6/29 Parent Program Leader Training

7/6 Middle School Training

7/12 High School Training

7/28 Transitions Training

Click here to view the full Summer schedule (check back for future dates).

 

On-Site Training Workshop – We can send a trainer to you! To obtain a quote or request an on-site training workshop, email training@nhpamail.com or call 800-293-4969.

 

Training of Trainers (TOT) Workshop – This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct LST workshops for your organization*.

October 27-28, 2016White Plains, NY

 *Eligibility limited to those who complete an LST workshop and implement the program for at least one full semester.


Do you have a prevention plan for next year?

May 24, 2016

Let us help you plan for next year…

DSCN0490At Botvin LifeSkills Training, we know that part of a successful implementation includes buy-in from decision-makers, staff, community, and students. As this school year comes to a close, let us help you plan your prevention strategy for the 2016-2017 school year.

We offer custom brochures and one-page overviews of our evidence-based prevention programs, as well as curriculum samples and preview copies of our Teacher’s Manuals and Student Guides. We can even host a webinar for you and your staff to learn more about a specific program.

Contact us to learn more

New Professional Development Workshop

May 16, 2016

NHPA is pleased to offer Substance Abuse Prevention workshops designed for health educators and professionals seeking to expand their experience, knowledge, and skills related to prevention education.

Teaching Marijuana Prevention

MJ crop.pngThe status of marijuana has undergone rapid legal and cultural shifts in recent years. These changes present specific challenges to school and community health educators.

In this workshop, participants will explore the social and legal trends in acceptance, the pharmacology of marijuana, and effective strategies for responding to the misconceptions adolescents hold about marijuana.

 

Click to download >>> Enrollment Form and email to training@nhpamail.com or fax to 914-421-2007. SPACE IS LIMITED!

 


Students in Bermuda Complete LifeSkills Training

May 9, 2016

CADA-Encouraging-Responsible-Alcohol-Behavior

CADA, along with prevention partners, DNDC and PRIDE, handed out certificates to 53 BHS students for completing the LifeSkills Training Program.

CADA spokesperson Anthony Santucci said, “LifeSkills Training [LST] is a research-validated substance abuse prevention program, proven to reduce the risks of alcohol, tobacco, drug abuse and violence by targeting the major social and psychological factors that promote the initiation of substance use and other risky behaviors.

“This comprehensive and exciting program provides adolescents and young teens with the confidence and skills necessary to successfully handle challenging situations.”


Community-based Prevention Reduces Alcohol, Tobacco & Marijuana Use

April 29, 2016
Check out how the Substance Awareness Center of Indian River County, FL partnered with the school board, superintendent, principals, faculty, law enforcement, and community members in a comprehensive effort to reduce the likelihood of teen use throughout their community. Among Indian River middle school students,  LifeSkills Training produced significant improvements in health knowledge, anti-drug attitudes, and life and refusal skills. Click here to full Case StudyIRC-LST_infographic_D5-page-001

LifeSkills Parent Program Leader Training

April 19, 2016

PP set no bg copyRegister below and learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program

May 3 and 4, 2016 – 12 noon (ET) Live I and II

Enroll by 4/24 to save $40. Space is limited.

The LifeSkills Training Parent Program is proven to help families by strengthening family communication.* The program helps keep children from using drugs, is ideal for parenting workshops or self-paced, and is available in Spanish.

*A study in the Journal of Child and Family Studies shows that family-based prevention programs can be an effective way to prevent adolescent substance use.

Webinar tomorrow: LifeSkills Training – A proven, effective program for Violence Prevention

March 17, 2016

WEBINAR: Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) –  A proven, effective program for Violence Prevention 

Are you applying for the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) grant?  Is LST your program of choice?   If so, we want to help!

In this informative webinar, we will help prospective applicants understand how the LST program can meet the grant objectives and anticipated impacts expected as part of the funding.  We will also discuss implementation options and fidelity guidelines to ensure that applicants understand how the LST program can fit into their existing or projected implementation plans.

Duration:  45 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: Free

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register:  Friday March 18th at 10am ET After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


Ohio Attorney General offering grants for Botvin LifeSkills Training

March 16, 2016

Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today that his office is now accepting from law enforcement agencies within Ohio new Drug Use Prevention grant applications for 2016-2017. The funds will aid efforts beginning on or after Sept. 1, 2016, and ending Aug. 31, 2017.

“It’s important that we deliver ongoing drug prevention information to students that is appropriate for their age and grade level, so they can make smart decisions,” said Attorney General DeWine. “I hope law enforcement agencies across Ohio will take advantage of these resources in their continuing efforts to protect young people.”

Several kinds of programs are eligible for funding, including Botvin LifeSkills Training.

Application deadline is 4/15/16

http://www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/DrugUsePrevention


Blueprints Certifies LST as a Model Plus Program

March 15, 2016

modelplus.png

The Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Program has been certified as a Model Plus program by Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development. Blueprints Certified means that LST meets the highest standards of evidence through independent review by the nation’s top scientists.

Similar to the Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) Seal of Approval, the Blueprints Certified seal and “Standards of Evidence” education program assists leaders in making more effective program choices, and ultimately achieve better outcomes and more cost effective use of scarce resources.  In addition, these new “Standards of Evidence” education materials provide guidance to decision makers when navigating the myriad of program choices.

Now key community decision makers can instantly recognize and understand that LST meets a higher standard of evidence and is Blueprints Certified.


Rapides Foundation offers health funding opportunities

March 14, 2016

The Rapides Foundation has several funding opportunities available for health initiatives.

Those include two new Healthy Behaviors grant opportunities for projects that support tobacco prevention and control, access to nutritious food, physical activity and/or substance and alcohol-abuse prevention through strategic actions within the nine area parishes served by the foundation.

These competitive grant opportunities are the Healthy Behaviors Program Grant; the Healthy Behaviors Mini Grant; and the Workforce Opportunity Grant. Grant proposals should impact residents within the parishes of Allen, Avoyelles, Catahoula, Grant, LaSalle, Natchitoches, Rapides, Vernon and/or Winn.

Eligibility for grant opportunities vary, but in general, applicants must be nonprofit organizations classified as tax-exempt under Section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code, or a government organization.

For more information, call 318-443-3394 or visit www.rapidesfoundation.org


LST webinars full… New date added

March 4, 2016

Wow! This week’s webinars are completely filled.  Due to an overwhelming response, we are hosting another live webinar next week. See registration link below.

LifeSkills Training Middle School program: Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth

In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.

Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.

Duration:  30 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: $0.00 (Space is limited)

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register: Thursday, March 10th at 11am ET After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


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