LifeSkills Training webinars for all levels. Space is limited. Register early!

September 21, 2016
Are you ready for the new school year? Join us on a webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…
Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

Palm SpringsWe’re excited to offer a series of webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

NEW DATES ADDED

Elementary Program – Tuesday, 10/4 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/hhezd5n

Middle School – Wednesday, 10/5 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/hxpjzws

High School Program – Thursday, 10/6 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/jtatbfq

Transitions Program – Friday, 10/7 (11am ET – noon) http://tinyurl.com/h7wpenl

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

 

There’s still time to register: Training of Trainers (TOT) Workshop, 10/27-10/28

September 9, 2016

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This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct LST workshops for your organization.  Eligibility limited to those who complete an LST workshop and implement the program for at least one full semester.

Greater NYC Area: October 27 – 28, 2016*

 *Space is limited; please register early.


ONDCP announces grants for nearly 700 communities to prevent youth substance use

September 7, 2016

Last week the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), Michael Botticelli, announced $85.9 million in grants for 698 Drug-Free Communities (DFC) Support Programs across the country.  The grants will provide funding to local community coalitions for preventing youth substance use including prescription drugs, marijuana, tobacco, and alcohol. DFC’s 2014 National Evaluation Report showed a significant decrease in past-30-day use of prescription drugs among youth in DFC communities. The report also found a significant decrease in past-30-day use between the first and most recent data reports for alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among middle school and high school youth in DFC communities.

 

Read the White House news release here


Complimentary webinars are back!

August 30, 2016
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Webinar Series: Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

Back by popular demand! We’re offering another series of free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LifeSkills Training program.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

 

LifeSkills Training High School Program (grades 9 or 10)
Tuesday, September 20, 2016       3pm ET – 4pm ET

LifeSkills Training Middle School Program (grades 6 – 8)

Wednesday, September 21, 2016     11am ET – noon ET

 LifeSkills Training Elementary Program (grades 3 – 5)

Wednesday, September 21, 2016   3pm ET – 4pm ET

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

Free webinar, 8/26 at 11am ET

August 25, 2016

There’s still time to register for Friday’s webinar:

Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training Parent Program

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We’re excited to this free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

Space is limited.  Click this link to register


Learn how to kick off the new school year with a free LifeSkills webinar

August 23, 2016

midschool-330-2Are you ready for the new school year?

Join us on a complimentary webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…

Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

We’re excited to offer a series of free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

NEW DATES ADDED

High School Program – Tuesday, 9/20 (3pm ET – 4pm) http://tinyurl.com/jyvtogj

Middle School Program – Wednesday, 9/21 (11am ET -noon) http://tinyurl.com/jz8ruhk

Elementary Program – Wednesday, 9/21 (3pm ET – 4pm) http://tinyurl.com/gvqfm2r

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 


Are you ready for the new school year? Join us on a webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…

August 16, 2016
Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

We’re excited to offer a series of webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

WEBINAR SCHEDULE

Elementary School Program – Monday, 8/22 (11am ET – noon)

Middle School Program – Tuesday, 8/23 (11am ET – noon)

High School Program – Wednesday, 8/24 (11am ET – noon)

Transitions Program – Thursday, 8/25 (11am ET – noon)

Parent Program – Friday, 8/26 (11am ET – noon)

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

 


Head back to school with LifeSkills

August 9, 2016

Promote educational success by teaching students life skills to:

*Enhance self-esteem13912761_10153867532045857_56361278605721723_n

*Develop problem-solving abilities

*Reduce stress and anxiety

*Communicate clearly and resolve conflicts

*Build effective resistance pressures to use tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs

As you head back to school, let us help you plan your health and wellness strategy with one-page overviews of our programs, as well as samples and preview copies of Teacher’s Manuals and Student Guides. We can even host a webinar for you and your staff to learn more about a specific LifeSkills Training program.

Contact us to learn more at lstinfo@nhpamail.com or 800-293-4969


Affirmative Consent Policies and Legislation: “Yes means Yes!” Replacing “No means No!”

July 28, 2016

Sexual assault can happen to anyone regardless of gender, sex, or sexual orientation. Concerns about what constitutes consent are core issues that have risen with the recent increase in high-profile college sexual assault cases at Steubenville, Vanderbilt, and Stanford . A majority of Americans are familiar with the phrase “No means No” in regards to sexual consent. However, it is apparent that not everyone is able to say “no.” In the cases where a victim does not say no, this indicates a lack of consent.consent

There are of course other factors to be considered. State and federal laws are now addressing those factors by removing the previous “No means No” mantra and replacing it with “Yes means Yes,” along with affirmative consent legislation. California, New York, Illinois, and Connecticut have already enacted affirmative consent laws, and 18 other states are currently drafting legislation. Colleges and universities are creating their own affirmative consent policies as they wait for state and federal action.

Currently, affirmative consent policies or laws require:

  • All individuals be conscious
  • All individuals be in a coherent state of mind (i.e., not incapacitated)
  • All individuals actively and equally participate without hesitation
  • There is an absence of coercion, physical force, or threat of physical force
  • There is an enthusiastic yes, to be verbalized

With more of the public attention focusing on the issue of consent, school policies and state and federal laws are being asked to provide clear definitions for affirmative consent. Policies now acknowledge that previous consensual relations do not constitute consent for future sexual acts. During intimacy, each act is acknowledged as separate, and giving consent for one action does not mean the individual is consenting to everything or anything that follows. Most important, policies now clarify that consent can also be withdrawn at any time.

In the act of changing the mantra we use from “No Means No!” to “Yes Means Yes!” we, as a society, are acknowledging that an absence of “No” does not constitute consent. Instead we are reaffirming that consent must be freely given, free of physical force and coercion, as a conscious decision, and enthusiastically.

 

Sources: The Affirmative Consent Project (2016), The New York Times, NPR.

Writer: Melanie Emerson is a recent Health Science graduate of Gettysburg College.  While in college she interned at a women’s health center involving issues related to sexual health, assault, and domestic violence. 


The Truth About Drug Use in Middle School Students

July 27, 2016

rx.jpgPrescription drugs can do a lot to help people with medical conditions and, when used appropriately, they can have a positive impact. Unfortunately, many of these drugs are misused and abused by middle-school-aged youth. According to the 2014 Monitoring the Future Survey, the prevalence of prescription drug use in 8th graders was 1.7% and rose to 4.7% by 12th grade. Thirty-three percent of teens believe it is okay to use prescription drugs for an injury, illness, or physical pain even if it has not been prescribed for them. And in 2012, The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study found that a total of 20% of children have misused or abused a prescription drug before the age of 14. Thus, it is essential to educate students on how not to take drugs prescribed to others.

Prescription drug abuse is many times a result of boredom, a need to escape troubles, or a longing to get high. Social pressures and the overwhelming desire to look “cool” in the eyes of peers can also be a driving factor to engage in these behaviors. Students may urge others to use prescription drugs by saying the common phrase “just try it for fun.” Prescription drug abuse has also become more prevalent because of easy accessibility in the family medicine cabinet. A suggested method of prevention is for parents to talk to their children through times of pressure or unhappiness

National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) is aware of this issue, and is currently creating new sessions on prescription drug abuse for middle-school-aged youth. Based on Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST), the goal of this program is to bring attention to the dangers of prescription drug abuse and misuse while teaching students the skills to refuse them. This adaptation will educate youth on healthy behavioral practices as well as help to deter them from engaging in dangerous health behaviors.

Sources: Monitoring the future national survey results on drug use, 1975–2013: Volume I, secondary school students, University of Utah Health Care.

Writer: Amanda Flower is a rising junior majoring in Public Health at Muhlenberg College

 


Prescription Drug Abuse: Sharing Is Not Caring

July 26, 2016

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine reported that nearly 60 percent of Americans have opioid painkillers that they no longer use. Within this group, 20 percent of participants stated they shared their opioid painkillers with another person.

Those who shared their medication reported that the primary reason for doing so was to help the other person manage their pain. The second most reported reason was because the person asking for the medication did not have the money to pay for the medication or did not have health insurance.

Possession of opioids by people other than the patients to whom they were prescribed is a growing problem, because misusing prescription medication is both physically harmful and illegal.

Because prescription medication is widely used for the treatment of an array of illnesses and disorders, many Americans do not see a problem with sharing their prescription medication to help their friends and family. In an article in the Washington Post, Johns-Hopkins professor Colleen L. Barry calls for a change of public opinion, stating that it is crucial that officials send “a clear-cut public health message that these medications should never be shared in any circumstance.”

The amount of prescription drug abuse is on the rise, especially among adolescents. In a study published by University of Central Florida professor Jason A. Ford, Ph.D., 22 percent of high school students reported nonmedical use of prescription drugs at some point in their lifetime, with 15 percent reporting nonmedical prescription drug abuse within the last year.

Researchers at National Health Promotion Associates are working to develop a Middle School Prescription Drug Abuse program. The program, based on their LifeSkills Training program, aims to prevent drug use by teaching adolescents to use personal self-management skills, social competency skills, and drug refusal skills.  Developers of the program hope to see reductions in abuse by raising awareness at an early age of the potential harm that can come from sharing prescription drugs and providing the tools needed to increase resilience and stimulate personal growth.

The Food and Drug Administration lists proper disposal techniques as one way  of preventing nonmedical prescription drug abuse. To dispose of unused prescription drugs, drop them off at an authorized collector in your community. You can find authorized collectors in your community by calling your local law-enforcement agency or doing an Internet search to locate prescription drug take-back programs.

Sources: DrugFree.org, The Washington Post, Jama Internal Medicine, The Prevention Researcher

Writer: Brooke Dugan is a rising senior majoring in Psychology and Communication at Loyola University Maryland.  


Youth Perception of Marijuana Harm Decreases as Marijuana Concentrate Becomes More Potent

June 30, 2016

Although marijuana use among youth poses a risk to health, nationally only 1 in 5 adolescents perceived it as such. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this misperception among youth exists at a time when marijuana concentrates continue to become more potent, which is cause for public concern. This demonstrates the need to educate young people about various forms of marijuana and their related health consequences and harms.

According to SAMHSA’s Short Report, “State Estimates of Adolescent Marijuana Use and Perceptions of Risk of Harm from Marijuana Use: 2013 and 2014 ,” in the 12 to 17 age group, approximately 1.8 million youth reported using marijuana in the past month.

Health risks associated with youth marijuana use  include poorer education/employment outcomes ,cognitive problemsincreased likelihood of vehicle crashes , and increased addiction risk .

The Drug Enforcement Agency describes marijuana concentrate  as a substance containing highly potent THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of marijuana). This concentrate is often referred to as oil or “710” (“OIL” spelled upside down and backwards). THC levels in this oil could range from 40 to 80 percent, which is about four times stronger than what is found in a “high grade” marijuana plant.

Read more from SAMHSA

SOURCE: US Department of Education 06-29-16 ED’s OSHS PREVENTION NEWS DIGEST-Vol. 12, No. 24


Professional Development Workshop, 7/11

June 29, 2016

Are you prepared to teach marijuana prevention? Join us for this 2-part professional development workshop on 7/11 & 7/15 where we will:

  • Examine trends in the social & legal acceptance of marijuana in the US
  • Consider effective strategies in responding to learners
  • Develop specific responses to challenging questions that may arise in school and community education settings

Space is limited. Click here to register> http://bit.ly/294gvGs

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As Fewer Teens Are Smoking Cigarettes, More Are Using E-Cigs

June 24, 2016

Fewer U.S. teens are smoking regular cigarettes, but more are using e-cigarettes, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Last year, 11 percent of high school students said they smoked a regular cigarette in the last 30 days, while 24 percent said they used e-cigarettes in the past month. The survey found 45 percent of teens said they had tried an e-cigarette at least once.

Current cigarette use has decreased significantly. In 1991, 28 percent of high school students said they smoked cigarettes. The findings come from the National Youth Risk and Behavior Survey, which included more than 15,000 high school students.

“Current cigarette smoking is at an all-time low, which is great news. However, it’s troubling to see that students are engaging in new risk behaviors, such as using e-cigarettes,” CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, said in a news release. “We must continue to invest in programs that help reduce all forms of tobacco use, including e-cigarettes, among youth.”

The survey also found fewer high school students reported illicit use of a prescription drug one or more times. In 2009, 20 percent of teens said they had taken prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription, compared with 17 percent in 2015.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, 06-23-16 ED’s OSHS PREVENTION NEWS DIGEST-Vol. 12, No. 23


Parent Program Leader Training Workshop

June 21, 2016
The LifeSkills Training Parent Program is proven to help families by strengthening family communication.* The program helps keep children from using drugs, is ideal for parenting workshops or self-paced, and is available in Spanish.

Register today and learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program

ParentingClick the link  below for an enrollment form and fax or email it to olt@nhpamail.com

June 29, 2016 – 11am (ET)

Space is limited!

 

 

*A study in the Journal of Child and Family Studies shows that family-based prevention programs can be an effective way to prevent adolescent substance use.

Free webinar: space is limited

June 15, 2016

Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.

LifeSkills Training Middle School program:  Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth

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In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.

 

Duration:  60 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: $0.00 (Space is limited)

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register:  Wednesday June 22nd, 11:30 am ET  After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

 


Get trained before the school year ends

June 7, 2016

In addition to helping kids resist drug, alcohol and tobacco use, the LifeSkills Training  program also effectively supports the reduction of violence and other high-risk behaviors.

midschool-330-2

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

  • Personal Self-Management Skills
  • General Social Skills
  • Drug Resistance Skills

 

 

ONLINE TRAINING WORKSHOP

Learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Middle School Program

New date added! Click to register>>> June 13, 2016 (space is limited)


Summer Schedule: LifeSkills Training Workshops

June 2, 2016

Spaces fill up quickly! Register early to save.

Online Training Workshop –Flexible and convenient; these provider training workshops are accessible from your work or personal computer. Enroll early to save!

6/14 Elementary School Training

6/29 Parent Program Leader Training

7/6 Middle School Training

7/12 High School Training

7/28 Transitions Training

Click here to view the full Summer schedule (check back for future dates).

 

On-Site Training Workshop – We can send a trainer to you! To obtain a quote or request an on-site training workshop, email training@nhpamail.com or call 800-293-4969.

 

Training of Trainers (TOT) Workshop – This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct LST workshops for your organization*.

October 27-28, 2016White Plains, NY

 *Eligibility limited to those who complete an LST workshop and implement the program for at least one full semester.


Do you have a prevention plan for next year?

May 24, 2016

Let us help you plan for next year…

DSCN0490At Botvin LifeSkills Training, we know that part of a successful implementation includes buy-in from decision-makers, staff, community, and students. As this school year comes to a close, let us help you plan your prevention strategy for the 2016-2017 school year.

We offer custom brochures and one-page overviews of our evidence-based prevention programs, as well as curriculum samples and preview copies of our Teacher’s Manuals and Student Guides. We can even host a webinar for you and your staff to learn more about a specific program.

Contact us to learn more

New Professional Development Workshop

May 16, 2016

NHPA is pleased to offer Substance Abuse Prevention workshops designed for health educators and professionals seeking to expand their experience, knowledge, and skills related to prevention education.

Teaching Marijuana Prevention

MJ crop.pngThe status of marijuana has undergone rapid legal and cultural shifts in recent years. These changes present specific challenges to school and community health educators.

In this workshop, participants will explore the social and legal trends in acceptance, the pharmacology of marijuana, and effective strategies for responding to the misconceptions adolescents hold about marijuana.

 

Click to download >>> Enrollment Form and email to training@nhpamail.com or fax to 914-421-2007. SPACE IS LIMITED!

 


Students in Bermuda Complete LifeSkills Training

May 9, 2016

CADA-Encouraging-Responsible-Alcohol-Behavior

CADA, along with prevention partners, DNDC and PRIDE, handed out certificates to 53 BHS students for completing the LifeSkills Training Program.

CADA spokesperson Anthony Santucci said, “LifeSkills Training [LST] is a research-validated substance abuse prevention program, proven to reduce the risks of alcohol, tobacco, drug abuse and violence by targeting the major social and psychological factors that promote the initiation of substance use and other risky behaviors.

“This comprehensive and exciting program provides adolescents and young teens with the confidence and skills necessary to successfully handle challenging situations.”


Community-based Prevention Reduces Alcohol, Tobacco & Marijuana Use

April 29, 2016
Check out how the Substance Awareness Center of Indian River County, FL partnered with the school board, superintendent, principals, faculty, law enforcement, and community members in a comprehensive effort to reduce the likelihood of teen use throughout their community. Among Indian River middle school students,  LifeSkills Training produced significant improvements in health knowledge, anti-drug attitudes, and life and refusal skills. Click here to full Case StudyIRC-LST_infographic_D5-page-001

LifeSkills Parent Program Leader Training

April 19, 2016

PP set no bg copyRegister below and learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program

May 3 and 4, 2016 – 12 noon (ET) Live I and II

Enroll by 4/24 to save $40. Space is limited.

The LifeSkills Training Parent Program is proven to help families by strengthening family communication.* The program helps keep children from using drugs, is ideal for parenting workshops or self-paced, and is available in Spanish.

*A study in the Journal of Child and Family Studies shows that family-based prevention programs can be an effective way to prevent adolescent substance use.

Webinar tomorrow: LifeSkills Training – A proven, effective program for Violence Prevention

March 17, 2016

WEBINAR: Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) –  A proven, effective program for Violence Prevention 

Are you applying for the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) grant?  Is LST your program of choice?   If so, we want to help!

In this informative webinar, we will help prospective applicants understand how the LST program can meet the grant objectives and anticipated impacts expected as part of the funding.  We will also discuss implementation options and fidelity guidelines to ensure that applicants understand how the LST program can fit into their existing or projected implementation plans.

Duration:  45 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: Free

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register:  Friday March 18th at 10am ET After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


Ohio Attorney General offering grants for Botvin LifeSkills Training

March 16, 2016

Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today that his office is now accepting from law enforcement agencies within Ohio new Drug Use Prevention grant applications for 2016-2017. The funds will aid efforts beginning on or after Sept. 1, 2016, and ending Aug. 31, 2017.

“It’s important that we deliver ongoing drug prevention information to students that is appropriate for their age and grade level, so they can make smart decisions,” said Attorney General DeWine. “I hope law enforcement agencies across Ohio will take advantage of these resources in their continuing efforts to protect young people.”

Several kinds of programs are eligible for funding, including Botvin LifeSkills Training.

Application deadline is 4/15/16

http://www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/DrugUsePrevention


Blueprints Certifies LST as a Model Plus Program

March 15, 2016

modelplus.png

The Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Program has been certified as a Model Plus program by Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development. Blueprints Certified means that LST meets the highest standards of evidence through independent review by the nation’s top scientists.

Similar to the Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) Seal of Approval, the Blueprints Certified seal and “Standards of Evidence” education program assists leaders in making more effective program choices, and ultimately achieve better outcomes and more cost effective use of scarce resources.  In addition, these new “Standards of Evidence” education materials provide guidance to decision makers when navigating the myriad of program choices.

Now key community decision makers can instantly recognize and understand that LST meets a higher standard of evidence and is Blueprints Certified.


Rapides Foundation offers health funding opportunities

March 14, 2016

The Rapides Foundation has several funding opportunities available for health initiatives.

Those include two new Healthy Behaviors grant opportunities for projects that support tobacco prevention and control, access to nutritious food, physical activity and/or substance and alcohol-abuse prevention through strategic actions within the nine area parishes served by the foundation.

These competitive grant opportunities are the Healthy Behaviors Program Grant; the Healthy Behaviors Mini Grant; and the Workforce Opportunity Grant. Grant proposals should impact residents within the parishes of Allen, Avoyelles, Catahoula, Grant, LaSalle, Natchitoches, Rapides, Vernon and/or Winn.

Eligibility for grant opportunities vary, but in general, applicants must be nonprofit organizations classified as tax-exempt under Section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code, or a government organization.

For more information, call 318-443-3394 or visit www.rapidesfoundation.org


LST webinars full… New date added

March 4, 2016

Wow! This week’s webinars are completely filled.  Due to an overwhelming response, we are hosting another live webinar next week. See registration link below.

LifeSkills Training Middle School program: Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth

In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.

Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.

Duration:  30 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: $0.00 (Space is limited)

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register: Thursday, March 10th at 11am ET After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


Webinar: Intro to LifeSkills Middle School program

February 25, 2016

LifeSkills Training Middle School program:  Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth

In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.

Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.

Duration:  30 minutes

Format:  Webinar

Cost: $0.00 (Space is limited)

About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.

Register: Two dates to choose from-  Tuesday, March 1st, 1pm ET or  Thursday, March 3rd, 10am ET

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


New Grant Opportunities from SAMHSA

February 10, 2016

STRATEGIC PREVENTION FRAMEWORK – PARTNERSHIPS FOR SUCCESS

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) is accepting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2016 Strategic Prevention Framework – Partnerships for Success (SPF-PFS) grants.  The purpose of this grant program is to address two of the nation’s top substance abuse prevention priorities: 1) underage drinking among persons aged 12 to 20; and 2) prescription drug misuse among persons aged 12 to 25.  At their discretion, states/tribes may also use grant funds to target an additional, data-driven substance abuse prevention priority (marijuana, heroin, etc.) in their state/tribe.  The SPF-PFS grant program is intended to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance misuse and its related problems while strengthening prevention capacity and infrastructure at the state, tribal, and community levels.

Eligibility is limited to states and tribal entities that have completed a SPF SIG grant and are not currently receiving funds through SAMHSA’s SPF-PFS grant.  SAMHSA is limiting eligibility to these entities because they have the greatest likelihood of achieving success through the SPF-PFS grant program.  Current SPF-PFS and SPF SIG grantees (with the exception of eligible SPF-PFS and SPF SIG grantees that are in a No Cost Extension) are excluded from applying for the SPF-PFS grant because they already have the resources in place to support the SPF infrastructure and address their areas of highest need, which can include underage drinking or prescription drug misuse.

Anticipated Total Available Funding: $1,230,000

Anticipated Number of Awards: Up to 3

Anticipated Award Amount: From $318,543 to $1,230,000 per year

Length of Project: Up to 5 years

Contact Information:

Program Issues

Tonia F. Gray, MPH
240-276-2492 Phone
tonia.gray@samhsa.hhs.gov

Grants Management and Budget Issues

Eileen Bermudez
(240) 276-1412
FOACSAP@samhsa.hhs.gov

Application deadline is 4/12/16


2017 School-Based Tobacco Use Prevention Grant

February 8, 2016

On January 6, 2016, the Vermont Agency of Education released the 2017 Grant Application due on April 29, 2016 through the Grantium system.

Save the date for the March 16, 2016 Grant Writing Workshop & Bidder’s Conference to bring teams together from interested Supervisory Unions to assist them in preparing their application.

Due to the fact that the 2017 School-Based Tobacco Use Prevention Grant is a competitive grant all questions will be gathered, answered in writing and then posted on the AOE Tobacco Prevention page. Questions received up to February 1, 2016 will be answered and posted on the AOE Tobacco Prevention page on February 15, 2016. Questions received after February 1, 2026 will be responded to at the March 16, 2016 Grant Writing Workshop & Bidder’s Conference.

All questions should be submitted to robert.uerz@vermont.gov.

Or visit this link for more information: http://education.vermont.gov/atod-prevention/tobacco-use


LifeSkills Training Protects Teens from Prescription Opioid Abuse

February 4, 2016

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., Feb. 4, 2016  — Recent research reveals an effective new strategy for combating the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse among youth. Researchers funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reported that a school-based prevention program, called Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST), delivered in 7th grade classrooms can help students avoid misusing prescription opioids and other drugs throughout their teen years.midschool-330-2

Through the LST program, students learn not only how to resist pressures to smoke, drink, and use drugs, they also learn important life skills such as how to make informed decisions and solve problems, how to manage stress and anxiety, and how to communicate clearly. The combination of drug resistance skills and life skills has proven to be a powerful formula for preventing drug use and even violence.

The new study also showed that LST’s impact on prescription opioid misuse made it a good financial investment for communities.  The evaluation showed that communities that implemented LST more than recouped its cost in reduced health, social, and other expenditures related to teen prescription opioid misuse.

“We know that effective prevention programs can produce a powerful public health benefit by helping teens avoid the damaging effects of drug abuse and violence. This study proves that it can also cut prescription opioid misuse and can save money,” said Dr.Gilbert J. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College and developer of the LST program. “A relatively small upfront investment in a proven prevention program such as LST can yield tremendous health and economic benefits.”

Dr. D. Max Crowley from Duke University, with colleagues from Penn State University, evaluated the impacts of LST and two other school-based interventions. However, LST was the only intervention that was effective by itself. The researchers drew the data for the evaluation from a recent trial of the PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience (PROSPER) prevention program. PROSPER is led jointly by Richard Spoth at Iowa State University and Mark Greenberg at Penn State University, with research funding from NIDA.

Over 35 federally-funded studies show that LST protects teens against tobacco, alcohol, substance use, and other problem behaviors such as delinquency and violence. These benefits presumably would further increase communities’ economic advantage in implementing effective prevention programs.

About Botvin LifeSkills Training      

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) is a highly acclaimed, evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program used in schools and communities. LST has been extensively tested and proven to reduce tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use by as much as 80%. Long-term follow-up studies also show that it produces prevention effects that are durable and long-lasting. For more information visit www.lifeskillstraining.com

Contact:

Paulina Kalaj

Director, Communications & Media Relations

800-293-4969


E-cigarette ads reach nearly 7 in 10 middle and high school students

January 11, 2016

About 7 in 10 middle and high school students – more than 18 million young people – see e-cigarette advertising in stores, online, in newspapers and magazines, or on television and in movies, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report.  E-cigarette ads use many of the same themes – independence, rebellion, and sex – used to sell cigarettes. Advertising of tobacco products has been shown to cause young people to start using those products.  E-cigarettes typically deliver nicotine, which at a young age may cause lasting harm to brain development, promote addiction, and lead to sustained tobacco use.

 

For more information on CDC’s youth tobacco prevention activities, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/youth/index.htm


New Release: CDC 2014 School Health Profile

December 22, 2015

Today, CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) released the 2014 School Health Profiles (Profiles) results on the DASH Healthy Youth website at www.cdc.gov/schoolhealthprofiles.

 The release includes:

-a comprehensive report that includes results from surveys conducted in:

-48 states

-19 large urban school districts

-2 territories

-a fact sheet describing Profiles and highlighting key 2014 results

-a PowerPoint presentation that presents state results, by quartiles, on a U.S. map

-all questionnaires and item rationales

-information on how to obtain Profiles datasets

-technical documentation for data analysis

 

Profiles Background: The School Health Profiles (Profiles) is a system of surveys assessing school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Profiles surveys are conducted biennially by education and health agencies among middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers.

If you would like to receive updates and announcements on School Health Profiles in the future, please subscribe to the School Health Profiles list.

Twitter: Follow DrZazaCDC


Peru Joins 38 Countries Worldwide Using U.S. Drug Abuse Prevention Program

December 7, 2015

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Doctors in Peru are turning to a U.S.-based prevention program that has been tested and proven effective in preventing violence and substance abuse.  Over the next three years, Elementary, Middle and High school students in Lima will participate in the Botvin LifeSkills Training program, an evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program used throughout the world.

Global Reach Map

Through the LST program, students learn not only how to resist pressures to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and use illicit drugs. They also learn important life skills such as how to make informed decisions and solve problems, how to manage stress and anxiety, and how to communicate clearly. The combination of drug resistance skills and life skills has proven to be a powerful formula for preventing drug use and violence.

“We chose LST because it was evidence based, was flexible and could be taught by different types of professionals,” said Dr. Alfredo Massa, Director of Medico INTEGRO.  Dr. Massa went on to say that they chose LST to reduce drug use and violence in Lima. “It is easy to understand and teach, and has been used in many countries already.”

To date, an estimated 50,000 teachers, 10,000 schools, and 3 million students have participated in theLifeSkills Training program.

“We are thrilled to see increased usage of evidence-based prevention programs across the world,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, LST program developer and professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College. “The effectiveness of LST and its widespread use in the U.S. have paved the way for 38 other countries around the world to adopt our program.”

LST has been used with youth in all 50 states in the United States as well as in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Outside the United States, it has been used in Australia, Bermuda, Canada, Colombia, Croatia, Costa Rica, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Greece, Honduras, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela.

 


Winter Training Schedule

December 1, 2015
 

Online Training Workshops – LifeSkills Provider Trainings prepare teachers, school counselors, prevention specialists, police officers, community youth educators, and other program providers to effectively implement the state-of-the-art prevention education activities and teaching strategies found in the LifeSkills Training program. Flexible and convenient; these online workshops are accessible from your work or personal computer.

12/7 & 12/8 Elementary School Workshop

12/14 (one-day intensive) Middle School Workshop

12/15 (one-day intensive) High School Workshop

1/11 (one-day intensive) Parent Program Workshop

1/12 (one-day intensive) Transitions Workshop

Click here to view the full winter schedule (Enroll early to save $$$)

 

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On-Site Training Workshops – We can send a trainer to you. To obtain a quote or request an on-site training workshop, email training@nhpamail.com or call 800-293-4969.


Grants for Afterschool Programs Now Available

November 19, 2015

Funding Alert   

Grant: Many states around the country are conducting competitions to award 21st Century Community Learning Center grants. The funding is available through the federal 21st CCLC program, which is designed to provide academic enrichment opportunities, drug and violence prevention, and youth development activities to students during nonschool hours.

Funds may be used for drug and violence prevention programs, like Botvin LifeSkills Training which can be implemented in an after-school setting.

Eligibility: School districts, public charter schools, municipalities, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations and private corporations are eligible.

Deadline: Deadlines vary by state. Click here for full list of RFPs: ww2.ed.gov/programs/21stcclc/contacts.html#state

Preparing grant applications can be a bit challenging. Botvin LifeSkills Training offers several grant application tools to help you in applying for local, state, and federal funding.


New Botvin LST webinar added to the schedule!

November 16, 2015

Please register for LifeSkills Training Middle School program: Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth on Thursday, November 19, 2015 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST at: https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/6324888232832026370

In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.

Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.


Free webinar next week

November 12, 2015
WOW! This week’s 2 webinars are now completely filled to capacity. So by popular demand we added 2 more dates next week…
LifeSkills Training Middle School Program:  Effective and Engaging Prevention Education for Healthy and Drug-Free Youth
In this informative presentation, participants will explore the underpinnings of the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School program, review program levels and support, and gain insight into program fidelity and implementation options.
Are you considering implementing a quality evidence-based prevention program? Are you and or your colleagues interested in learning more about the field? Then join us at our webinar.
Duration:  30 minutes
Format:  Webinar
Cost: $0.00 (Space is limited)
About the Presenter:  Craig Zettle has presented at national and international conferences over the last 15 years.  He has been active in prevention education with the Botvin LifeSkills Training program for the last 10 years and regularly consults with schools, districts, federal and state agencies, as well as community-based organizations on the implementation and support of the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.
Register, 2 dates to choose from: Wednesday, November 18th at 11am ET  or  Thursday, November 19th at 1pm ET. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Carmel Unified School District Cuts Bullying, Drug, & Alcohol Use in Half

November 1, 2015
Carmel Case Study-page-001

CASE STUDY

Carmel Unified School district (CUSD) has reason to celebrate this school year as they find bullying, drugs and alcohol use are dwindling due to a multi-year implementation of Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST). Based on the most recent California Healthy Kids Survey results (2014-15), CUSD has seen reductions upwards of 50% for alcohol/drug use and incidents often associated with bullying.

CUSD’s Board of Education identified drug/alcohol and bullying prevention as a top priority and it has been the focus of an objective in the district’s long-term goals. Five years ago, the rural school district in California selected LST as their top prevention program in grades 3 – 10.

“In recent years a group of stakeholders evaluated several evidence-based prevention programs and it was clear from the research that one program stood out from the rest: Lifeskills Training,” said Heath Rocha, Chief Student Services Officer, CUSD.

Through the LST program, students learn more than how to resist pressures to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and use illicit drugs; they also learn important life skills such as problem-solving, how to manage stress and anxiety, and how to communicate clearly. The combination of drug resistance skills and life skills has proven to be a powerful formula for preventing drug use and bullying.

“With the enormous research supporting Lifeskills Training’s efficacy, coupled with our experience, there is not a better program in existence that does a better job promoting social-emotional development, positive behaviors and relationships, and reduces the risk of alcohol and drug use/abuse,” said Rocha.

In addition to implementing the LST in grades 3 – 10, CUSD created a multi-pronged approach that included a social norms campaign, a parent committee, counseling, and multiple initiatives including a voluntary drug testing program.


Just addded! LifeSkills Training Workshop dates in Nov & Dec

October 30, 2015

Ok! You asked and we listened… we’ve added a few more workshops for the remainder of 2015. They are filling up fast though so register now. Our 2016 schedule will be posted in December.

November and December LifeSkills Training Schedule

LifeSkills Training (LST) Workshops prepare teachers, school counselors, prevention specialists, police officers, community youth educators, and other program providers to effectively implement the state-of-the-art prevention education activities and teaching strategies found in the LST program.

Train to teach the LifeSkills Training Elementary, Middle, High School or Transitions programs.  We offer a LifeSkills Parent Program Leader Training workshop as well.


Several States move to increase smoking age to 21

October 21, 2015

Several States across the country have begun drafting legislation to increase the legal age for purchasing tobacco from 18 to 21, as Pew Charitable Trusts reported last week. Hawaii successfully passed legislation increasing the smoking age this past summer. California, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and Washington have also introduced measures to increase the smoking age, although none have passed thus far. Efforts to increase the smoking age are driven by new reports suggesting that increasing the smoking age to 21 would cut smoking by 12 percent, in addition to preventing 223,000 premature deaths. Researchers believe that the increase will prevent more people from starting to smoke, as “90 percent of adults who become daily smokers say they started before the age of 19.” Several smokers’ rights groups and retailers have warned against increasing the smoking age, suggesting that cigarette taxes comprise an important segment of State tax revenue.

 

Read the full story here: http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2015/10/14/should-the-smoking-age-be-21-some-legislators-say-yes

 


Head back to school with LifeSkills

September 1, 2015

When Effectiveness & Qumidschool-111512ality Count, LifeSkills Training is the Only Choice.

Dramatically Cuts:

  •  Drug Use by up to 75%
  •  Alcohol Use by up to 60%
  •  Violence by up to 50%
  •  Tobacco Use by up to 87%

Register for this online training workshop and learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Middle School Program: September 15th & 17th at 1pm ET


Applications available for grant program focused on drug prevention

August 26, 2015

HARRISBURG – Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane today issued a reminder to nonprofit and government agencies throughout the Commonwealth that the application for the Office of Attorney General’s Community Drug Abuse Prevention Grant Program is available online at www.attorneygeneral.gov .

Applications are currently being accepted for the grant period that ends June 30, 2016.

The Community Drug Abuse Prevention Grant Program is offered to nonprofit and government agencies to facilitate education and outreach activities centered on drug abuse and prevention. Since 1987, the Office of Attorney General has awarded more than $1.7 million to organizations across Pennsylvania as part of this program.

“As we continue to prosecute those who sell illegal drugs, it is equally important to inform the public about prevention skills and the dangers of drug use,” said Kane. “Education is an essential part of our efforts to target the drug epidemic that afflicts so many communities in the Commonwealth.”

The purpose of the Community Drug Abuse Prevention Grant Program is to bring an age-appropriate, innovative and fact-based educational program to students, parents and members of the community.  The message is limited to the dangers and effects of the illegal use of prescription drugs, illegal street drugs, synthetic drugs and underage drinking.

The goals of the program are:

  • To educate the public.
  • To prevent substance abuse by encouraging interaction and collaboration among community groups, parents, educators, students, businesses and law enforcement agencies.
  • To help develop and expand community groups and grassroots organizations dedicated to fighting drug and alcohol abuse.
  • To facilitate innovative, age appropriate drug and alcohol prevention programs.

Additional information regarding the Community Drug Abuse Prevention Grant Program is available by calling the Office of Attorney General at (717) 787-3391.


Teens, Puberty, and Risk-Taking

July 15, 2015

Why do teens take risks when with their peers? The adolescent brain itself may be to blame.

Acting recklessly in front of peers stimulates pleasure centers in an adolescent’s brain, which further encourages this kind of risky behavior. Numerous studies have indicated that the mere presence of peers significantly increases an adolescent’s risk-taking propensities.  Brain-imaging technology illustrates how the pleasure centers in the brain of an adolescent light up when peers are watching them perform;  in fact, the more stimulation that the center receives, the more risks the teen will take.

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) is an evidence-based substance abuse prevention program proven to reduce the risks of alcohol, tobacco, drug abuse, and violence by targeting the major social and psychological factors that promote risky behaviors. Adolescents learn skills that can help them successfully handle challenging situations and resist their hard-wired impulses to take unhealthy risks. Instead, they learn ways to adopt healthy alternatives to dangerous behavior.

One student from Vero Beach, Florida, who completed the LST program stated that the program helped her to realize that “the most important thing is to set a good example and show pride. It’s not always about being a part of the coolest clique or looking the best.”  She has since encouraged other teens to “set goals, stand up for what you believe in, have fun, be confident, and make the most of life,”  adding, “All of this has been shown to me in LifeSkills and has helped me become a better person, inside and out.”

To read more testimonials by both students and teachers, please visit: LifeSkills Training Testimonials


New Study Explores Bystander Intervention in Cyberbullying

July 13, 2015

A recent study, “Bystander Intervention in Cyberbullying,” was published by the National Communication Association’s Communication Monographs. The study highlighted the impact of bystanders in cyberbullying situations as well as discussed why there is a lower likelihood that a bystander intervenes during an online bullying incident.

Students in the study group were placed in hypothetical cyberbullying situations. Their responses were observed in order to understand more about how bystanders react online, as opposed to witnessing traditional bullying in-person. Researchers determined that many factors affect a bystander’s tendency to not intervene in a cyberbullying.

The study revealed that there is a greater sense of anonymity in web sites, social media platforms, and online chat pages. Bystanders are less likely to intervene in cyberbullying incidents because they are not easily discernable as witnesses to bullying and may feel distant or not responsible for speaking up. Moreover, cyberbullying allows bystanders to seem “invisible” and, because of this anonymity, don’t take the initiative to speak up for the victims of bullying.

This study exposed the importance of spreading awareness about cyberbullying. The findings demonstrate the potential of schools and communities to educate their stakeholders about cyberbullying and how the role of the bystander has changed with the emergence of social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

National Health Promotion Associates is currently developing an online cyberbullying prevention learning tool to address the current issues and educate middle-schoolers on cyberbullying and bullying in general. This new online platform is an extension of Botvin LifeSkills Training’s “Stand Up, Speak Up!” bullying curriculum.

http://www.newswise.com/articles/new-study-explores-bystander-intervention-in-cyberbullying


National Health Promotion Associates Hosts Summer Interns

July 1, 2015

WHITE PLAINS, NY – National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) welcomes a new class of interns for the 2015 summer program, Internship in Psychology, Health Education, and Communication.

interns 2015NHPA selected three interns from a crowded pool of extremely qualified applicants from colleges and universities around the country. This year’s interns include: Christopher Fox (Bates College), Samantha Goodman (University of Michigan), and Isabella Serrano (Brown University).

The interns will work on projects giving them a broad overview of the stages involved in developing educational prevention programs. The internship program will focus on issues related to health promotion and wellness, health communication and marketing, and the many facets of prevention.

“We are pleased to offer an internship in Psychology, Health Education, and Communication.  We are continually impressed by this group of students,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, the founder and president of NHPA. “They are bright, energetic and very well prepared by their previous course work. It is our hope that the interns return to their respective universities with a greater understanding of psychology in an applied setting. They are fully engaged in learning about a wide range of activities from early-stage conceptualization and evaluation of new prevention tools to the ultimate dissemination of new evidence-based preventive interventions. We are excited to have them spend time with us.”

Over the course of the summer, the interns will be involved in the development of numerous projects that employ Botvin Lifeskills Training (LST) at the National Health Promotion Associates headquarters. LST is an evidence-based prevention program for tobacco, alcohol and drug abuse, violence prevention, and bullying implemented in 38 countries around the world. Specifically, the interns will work on the application of the Botvin Lifeskills Training Program to the Youth Courts of Memphis Tennessee, help create an online cyber bullying prevention program, and take part in the development of an online sexual assault prevention program for college students.

About National Health Promotion Associates

Established in 1985, National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) is a dynamic health and wellness firm located in White Plains, New York. Dedicated to promoting behavioral health, NHPA focuses on developing, evaluating, and providing training to educators and health professionals on a range of health and wellness programs. An area of particular interest relates to the prevention of health risk behaviors among adolescents and young adults, including substance abuse, violence, bullying, and sexual violence. For more information visit: www.lifeskillstraining.com.


Free webinar: Learn grant-writing tips for the ‘Skills for Success’ Grant Competition

June 25, 2015

Recent research shows that students who graduate ready to succeed in college and careers have more than just academic skills. The most successful students pair cognitive skills with additional skills such as persisting through adversity, collaborating effectively and exercising self-discipline.

While we know that these additional skills are important, we want to learn more about the best ways to nurture them in our schools and classrooms. That’s why the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement announced an exciting new grant competition called Skills for Success.

They’re asking the nation’s most innovative education organizations, schools and districts to apply so that they can learn even more about how to give students these important skills. In particular, they’re focusing on middle grades – that time when students begin developing the habits and mindsets that they will take with them through life.

If you are part of an organization, school district or other team that’s working on giving middle school students all the skills they need to succeed, they would love to have you apply. Learn more.

Register for this free webinar for grant-writing tips:

Strategies for Incorporating LifeSkills Training into an Effective   2015 Skills for Success Program Grant Application

This informative webinar will explore successful grant-writing tips while incorporating the LifeSkills Training program into the US Department of Education’s Skills for Success application. Our goal is to help you be as informed as possible about the grant application process while supporting the inclusion of our program as a part of your comprehensive submission.

Duration: 30 minutes

Presenter: Pamela Werb, MEd, has been an LST trainer since 2001 and presented at national and international conferences. She graduated with a master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Minnesota and is currently a clinical research consultant with the University of Minnesota Tobacco Use Research Center.

Register: Monday, June 29th at 3:30pm ET  Space is limited    

Skills for Success Program

Grant: The Skills for Success Program supports Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) and their partners in implementing, evaluating, and refining tools and approaches for developing the non-cognitive skills of middle-grades students in order to increase student success. Grants provide funding for the implementation, evaluation, and refinement of existing tools and approaches that integrate the development of students’ non-cognitive skills into classroom-level activities and existing strategies designed to improve schools.

Funder: US Department of Education

Eligibility: Local educational agencies (LEAs), i.e., public school districts including charter schools that are considered LEAs under State law, and LEAs in partnership with a nonprofit, IHE or other LEAs

Estimated Available Funds: approximately $2,000,000 for FY2015

Deadline: 7/29/15


The need for prevention is now; Unleashing the Power of Prevention

June 24, 2015

Every day across America, behavioral health problems in childhood and adolescence take a heavy toll on millions of lives. These problems range from anxiety, depression and mental health problems, to poor eating habits and weight problems, to substance abuse, delinquency and violence. For decades the approach to these problems has been to treat them only after they’ve been identified—at a high and ongoing cost to young people, families, communities, and the entire nation. Now we have a 30-year body of research and more than 50 programs showing that behavioral health problems can be prevented.

LifeSkills Training is one such program. LST is a school-based prevention program designed to prevent behavioral health problems by promoting personal coping skills, general social skills, and information and attitudes related to specific health problems, and overall resilience. LST has been extensively tested and proven effective, with evidence of its effectiveness documented in over 32 peer-reviewed publications. This body of research shows that LST can prevent a wide range of behavioral health problems including tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug abuse; aggression and violence; risky driving; and risk factors related to HIV/AIDS. LST is effective when delivered by different types of program providers, under different implementation conditions, and with different populations and age-groups. And, it produces prevention effects that can last from adolescence to well into young adulthood.

But LST is just one of a growing number of tested and effective programs that have emerged from more than three decades of scientific research. This critical mass of prevention science is converging with growing interest in prevention across health care, education, child psychiatry, child welfare, and juvenile justice. Together, we stand at the threshold of a new age of prevention.

The challenge now is to mobilize across disciplines and communities to unleash the power of prevention on a nationwide scale. A new group of prevention experts, the Coalition for the Promotion Behavioral Health, proposes a grand challenge that will advance the policies, programs, funding, and workforce preparation needed to promote behavioral health and prevent behavioral health problems among all young people—including those at greatest disadvantage or risk, from birth through age 24. Within a decade, we can reduce the incidence and prevalence of behavioral health problems in this population by 20 percent from current levels through widespread policies and programs that will serve millions and save billions. Prevention is the best investment we can make, and the time to make it is now.

Read two recent papers on Unleashing the Power of Prevention, prepared by the Coalition for the Promotion of Behavioral Health and published by the National Academy of Medicine. The first paper, Unleashing the Power of Prevention, is concise summary of the advances in prevention science, examples of successful prevention programs, and opportunities.

http://nam.edu/perspectives-2015-unleashing-the-power-of-prevention/

The second paper, A Challenge to Unleash the Power of Prevention, is a commentary and call to arms.

http://nam.edu/perspectives-2015-a-challenge-to-unleash-the-power-of-prevention/


College Rape Prevention Program Proves a Rare Success

June 23, 2015

A trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine found a lowered risk of rape in college women who participated in an experimental sexual assault prevention program in Canada this past year.  This program addressed preventing sexual assault through a multifaceted approach, including defense skills, defining sexual boundaries, assessing and avoiding risky behavior like drugs and alcohol.

The study produced significant results: the risk of completed rape was lowered by 10 percent in the women who participated in the program, compared to 5 percent in the control group. Even more significant was the lowered risk of attempted rate in the resistance group–9.3%–compared to the 3.4% reduction in the control group.

This promising study highlighted key elements that are unique to other sexual assault prevention programs implemented at other colleges and universities at the moment. The program focused not only on education and prevention, but also on developing self-defense skills and increasing knowledge and awareness about acquaintance rape among other instances of sexual assault. However, there are arguments that the program focuses on helping potential victims avoid sexual assault rather than focusing on preventing perpetrators from attempting assault.

One important area that was focused on in this program was acquaintance rape and overcoming emotional barriers that victims of sexual violence face. Because the majority of sexual violence occurs between acquaintances, this program was successful because it focused on consent and helped college women understand how to maneuver social situations and use friends as bystanders.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/12/health/college-rape-prevention-program-proves-a-rare-success.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=mini-moth&region=top-stories-below&WT.nav=top-stories-below


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