Preventing Prescription Drug Misuse with LifeSkills Training: A Conversation Between Experts and Pennsylvania Providers

November 22, 2017

Hosted By…

epis

Are you:

  • Looking for ways to improve your current LST Program?
  • Looking to better understand how LST can prevent opioid misuse?
  • Interested in getting connected with other people or organizations in Pennsylvania who are implementing LifeSkills Training?

LifeSkills Training (LST) is an effective substance abuse prevention program that has been shown to:

  • Cut tobacco use by 87%
  • Cut alcohol use by 60%
  • Cut marijuana use by 75%
  • And more.

Program registries like SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Prevention Programs and Practices,  Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development and Crime Solutions all rate LST as highly effective. This provider call will feature a discussion of a new module that specifically addresses prescription drug abuse and the opioid crisis.

Join us on Thursday, November 30th from 2:00-3:00 EST for an LST Networking Call featuring experts from National Health Promotion Associates, the LST training and dissemination center. We’ll cover:

  • The new LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module
  • Practical tips for classroom management during LST delivery
  • Open Q&A period

While this call is primarily directed toward current Pennsylvania LST providers who want to improve their implementation, those interested in adopting the LST curriculum are encouraged to listen in.

Click this link to register for the FREE phone conference. Call in information will be provided with your registration confirmation.

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Schools Combat Opioid Crisis with Botvin LifeSkills’ New Rx Module

November 17, 2017

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Schools and communities are implementing a new module to combat the prescription drug and opioid crisis, now regarded as a national emergency. National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA), the researchers behind Botvin LifeSkills Training, developed a Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module to help youth avoid the dangers of prescription drug or opioid misuse/abuse.

The new LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module gives teens the skills and knowledge necessary to help them avoid the misuse/abuse of opioids and prescription drugs.   Available in a variety of formats that allows for both online and classroom delivery, the new module is ideal for school districts, community-based organizations, and agencies serving students in grades 6 – 9. The module is flexible enough to enhance the evience-based Botvin LifeSkills Training program or to be integrated into existing prevention programming.

The new module is designed to further enhance the effectiveness of the LST Middle School program, which has already been proven to reduce opioid and prescription drug misuse. A recent study funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) showed that the LST Middle School program delivered in 7th grade classrooms helped students avoid misusing/abusing prescriptions opioids and other drugs throughout their teen years. NHPA researchers say that the addition of this new module will reinforce the already effective LST program.

“NHPA is a leader in quality, effective evidence-based prevention education.  While our core Middle School program already has evidence demonstrating its effectiveness in reducing opioid and prescription drug misuse and abuse, the addition of this new module will help to specifically address the epidemic facing our nation.   The LST program has been tested through more than 30 years of rigorous scientific research and has identified prevention approaches that are effective, produce lasting results, and can save taxpayers a good deal of money,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College and developer of the LST program. “Let’s stop prescription opioid abuse before it begins. Now is the time to unleash the power of prevention.”

More than 35 federally funded studies have demonstrated that LST protects teens against tobacco, alcohol, substance use, and other problem behaviors such as delinquency and violence. According to a 2013 report on the economic benefit of evidence-based prevention programs, LST produced a $38 benefit for every $1 invested in terms of reduced corrections costs, welfare and social services burden, drug and mental health treatment; and increased employment and tax revenue. LST had the highest return on investment of all substance abuse prevention curricula studied.


Free Provider Training in Ohio

November 14, 2017

Prevention Action Alliance is hosting five (5) regional Middle School trainings and five (5) regional High School trainings. Please review the dates and locations below prior to making your ticket selection. If you would like to attend both Middle and High School trainings, you will need to complete each registration separately.

prevention action.png

Who should attend this training:
• Classroom teachers
• School counselors
• Prevention specialists
• Health professionals
• Mental Health Professionals
• Social Workers
• Community youth educators
• Law Enforcement Officers
• Older peer leaders

Cost: FREE

Lunch and a light breakfast will be included with your registration, and RCH’s will be available upon completion. Click here for dates or to register

DESCRIPTION

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) is a research-validated substance misuse prevention program proven to reduce the risks of alcohol, tobacco, drug abuse, and violence by targeting the major social and psychological factors that promote the initiation of substance use and other risky behaviors. This comprehensive and exciting program provides adolescents and young teens with the confidence and skills necessary to successfully handle challenging situations.

Rather than merely teaching information about the dangers of drug misuse, Botvin LifeSkills Training promotes healthy alternatives to risky behavior through activities designed to:
– Teach students the necessary skills to resist social (peer) pressures to smoke, drink, and use drugs
– Help students to develop greater self-esteem and self-confidence
– Enable students to effectively cope with anxiety
– Increase their knowledge of the immediate consequences of substance misuse
– Enhance cognitive and behavioral competency to reduce and prevent a variety of health risk behaviors


Advocates Recommend Botvin LifeSkills Training to Replace D.A.R.E.

November 8, 2017

In declaring a public health emergency over the opioid epidemic, President Trump called for the creation of a national media campaign to reduce drug use among young people.

As part of PBS NewsHour’s America Addicted series, William Brangham speaks with Gary Mendell of Shatterproof about what should be done to prevent addiction.

pbs-newshour-1920-1.jpg

PBS

“For example, there is a program called LifeSkills that’s in about 3 or 4% of our middle schools. It has great research behind it that shows that it works. Alternatively, there’s research that shows that DARE, which is in about 75% of our middle schools, doesn’t work. So, if we can move our middle schools to using LifeSkills, instead of DARE, the opportunity to reduce the number of our teens who ever use drugs is substantially higher.”  – Gary Mendell, Shatterproof

Interested in learning more about the evidence-based Botvin LifeSkills Training program? Email us for sample lessons, to request a preview copy of the curriculum, or register to attend an overview webinar presentation.

NIDA: LifeSkills Training Shields Teens from Prescription Opioid Abuse

November 7, 2017

Research reveals communities should consider a different strategy to combat the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse among youth; an evidence-based program called Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST). The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)supported researchers reported that the LST prevention curriculum, delivered in 7th grade classrooms, helps students avoid misusing prescription opioids throughout their teen years.rx

Through the LST program, students learn not only how to resist pressures to smoke, drink, and use drugs. They also learn important life skills such as how to make informed decisions and solve problems, how to manage stress and anxiety, and how to communicate clearly. The combination of drug resistance skills and life skills has proven to be a powerful formula for preventing drug use and even violence.

The new evaluation also determined that LST’s impact on prescription opioid misuse made it a good financial investment for communities.  The evaluation showed that communities that implemented LST more than recouped its cost in reduced health, social, and other expenditures related to teen prescription opioid misuse.

Click here for full article


Webinar: How LifeSkills Training can Keep Kids Healthy and Drug-free (space is limited)

November 6, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.


Teaching Marijuana Prevention (for health educators)

October 30, 2017

NHPA is pleased to offer Substance Abuse Prevention Workshops designed for health educators and professionals seeking to expand their experience, knowledge, and skills related to prevention education.

Teaching Marijuana Prevention – 2-part workshop on 12/6 & 12/12

The status of marijuana has undergone rapid legal and cultural shifts in recent years. These changes present specific challenges to school and community health educators.

In this workshop, participants will explore the social and legal trends in acceptance, the pharmacology of marijuana, and effective strategies for responding to the misconceptions adolescents hold about marijuana.

COST: $300 per person.   SPACE IS LIMITED!

NHPA TMP Dec 6 12 2017


Why starting young with prevention is key to combat opioid crisis

October 12, 2017

Schools and communities are searching for new tools to combat the prescription drug and opioid crisis, now regarded as a national emergency.

rx

A 2015 study funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found that there are evidence-based programs available that help students avoid misusing prescription opioids throughout their teenage years. And research suggests that these programs work better than traditional anti-drug abuse lectures (“Just Say No”) by strengthening children’s self-esteem, decision-making, and communication skills.

National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA), the researchers behind Botvin LifeSkills Training have developed a Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module to prevent youth opioid and Rx drug misuse/abuse.

The new LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module gives teens the skills and knowledge necessary to help them avoid the misuse/abuse of opioids and prescription drugs.  It will be available in a variety of formats that will allow for both online and classroom delivery. The new module is ideal for school districts, community-based organizations, and agencies serving students in grades 6 – 9. The module is flexible enough to enhance the award-winning Botvin LifeSkills Training program or to be integrated into existing prevention programming.

The new module is designed to further enhance the effectiveness of the LST Middle School program, which has been proven to reduce opioid and prescription drug misuse.

Let’s stop prescription opioid abuse before it begins. Now is the time to unleash the power of prevention.


Addressing the Opioid Crisis with a New Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module

October 11, 2017

Schools and communities are searching for new tools to combat the prescription drug and opioid crisis, now regarded as a national emergency. National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA), the researchers behind Botvin LifeSkills Training, have risen to the challenge of helping youth avoid the dangers of prescription drug or opioid misuse/abuse and are excited to announce the release of a Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module.

The new LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module gives teens the skills and knowledge necessary to help them avoid the misuse/abuse of opioids and prescription drugs.  It will be available in a variety of formats that will allow for both online and classroom delivery. The new module is ideal for school districts, community-based organizations, and agencies serving students ages 11 – 14. The module is flexible enough to enhance the award-winning Botvin LifeSkills Training program or to be integrated into existing prevention programming.

The new module is designed to further enhance the effectiveness of the LST Middle School program, which has been proven to reduce opioid and prescription drug misuse.   A study funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) showed that the LST Middle School program delivered in 7th grade classrooms helped students avoid misusing/abusing prescriptions opioids and other drugs throughout their teen years. NHPA researchers say that the addition of this new module will reinforce the already effective LST program.

“NHPA is a leader in quality, effective evidence-based prevention education.  While our core Middle School program already has evidence demonstrating its effectiveness in reducing opioid and prescription drug misuse and abuse, the addition of this new module will help to specifically address the epidemic facing our nation.   The LST program has been tested through more than 30 years of rigorous scientific research and has identified prevention approaches that are effective, produce lasting results, and can save taxpayers a good deal of money,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College and developer of the LST program. “Let’s stop prescription opioid abuse before it begins. Now is the time to unleash the power of prevention.”

More than 35 federally funded studies have demonstrated that LST protects teens against tobacco, alcohol, substance use, and other problem behaviors such as delinquency and violence. According to a 2013 report on the economic benefit of evidence-based prevention programs, LST produced a $38 benefit for every $1 invested in terms of reduced corrections costs, welfare and social services burden, drug and mental health treatment; and increased employment and tax revenue. LST had the highest return on investment of all substance abuse prevention curricula studied.


Mini-Grant Funding For Under 21 Substance Abuse Prevention Activities For FY 2018

October 4, 2017

INGMRF-00123027-001The Collaboration Council announces the availability of mini-grant funding to help community-based organizations deliver activities to middle and high school youth and those under age 21 that will help prevent their illegal use and abuse of alcohol, marijuana, over-the-counter, prescription and/or other drugs. Grants can range from $500 to $1,000; applicants must provide a local match (cash, in-kind) equal to 30% of the requested mini-grant amount. Applications are due November 1, 2017, 4:00 p.m. Expenses incurred for projects funded via these grants must begin after January 1, 2018 and conclude by May 31, 2018.

This is part of the Collaboration Council led Many Voices for Smart Choices – Montgomery County Alliance to Prevent Youth Substance Abuse. Funding comes from the Montgomery County government. For complete details and to download the Mini-Grant Application Announcement please click here. Please direct all questions to info@collaborationcouncil.org. Deadline for submitting questions is October 20, 2017, 4:00 p.m.

 


Schools play a critical role in promoting health & safety of teens

September 21, 2017

From U.S. Department of Education OSHS PREVENTION NEWS DIGEST-Vol. 13, No. 13

Seal_of_the_United_States_Department_of_Education.svgStudies have shown links between health-related behaviors and educational outcomes such as grades, test scores, and other measures of academic achievement; however, many of these studies have used samples that are not nationally representative or are out of date.

Analyses of nationwide 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data (controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, and grade in school) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that high school students who received mostly A’s, mostly B’s, or mostly C’s had significantly higher prevalence estimates for most protective health-related behaviors and significantly lower prevalence estimates for most health-related risk behaviors compared with students with mostly D’s/F’s.

School health interventions can promote positive health behaviors and improve both health and academic outcomes for students. Evidence suggests that educational and public health institutions have a shared interest in promoting student health and that collaborative efforts have the potential to make important strides in improving the health and academic achievement of youths.

Read the report here.


Preventing Overdoses in Youth: The Case for Supplying Schools with Naloxone

September 1, 2017

Drug overdose has become a leading cause of accidental death in the United States. As the opioid epidemic devastates communities across the country, adolescents are being increasingly exposed to opioids. This upsetting trend has not shown signs of slowing, as teen and young adult overdose death rates have steadily increased since 1999.

A 2014 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA) survey reported that almost half a million teens and 1.2 million young adults abused opioids and heroin during that year. In addition, a 2015 National Institutes of Health (NIH) study on drug abuse revealed that opioid abuse is the #1 cause of overdose death for 15-24 year olds and heroin abuse is the #4 cause of overdose death for the same age group after prescription and illicit drug abuse. This study also showed that teens and young adults are more than 4 times more likely to overdose on opioids today than they were 18 years ago.  

Due to these data and several incidents of drug overdose deaths in schools around the country, some school districts have begun to require school nurse facilities to be stocked with naloxone. Naloxone is an antidote that can treat narcotic overdose in emergency situations by quickly blocking opioid receptors. Many school officials, school nurses, and local politicians believe that supplying schools with the life-saving drug will give students another chance.1naloxone-kit.jpg

There has been opposition to the use of naloxone because of its cost and for fear that it will encourage more drug use; however, organizations such as the President’s Opioid Commission and The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) support making naloxone more available. NASN recognizes the responsibility school nurses have for protecting students and therefore determined that naloxone should be included in schools’ emergency preparedness response plans. NASN released a position statement emphasizing that “harm reduction approaches to [opioid pain reliever] overdose include expanding access to naloxone, an opioid overdose antidote, which can prevent overdose deaths by reversing life-threatening respiratory depression.” NASN’s rationale is based on the SAMHSA five strategic approaches to prevent overdose death:

  1. Call for help
  2. Check for signs of opioid overdose
  3. Support the person’s breathing
  4. Administer naloxone
  5. Monitor the person’s response

The NASN position statement concludes by stating the importance of preventing adolescents from ever abusing opioids.

National Health Promotion Associates, the creators of Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) (an evidence-based prevention program used in schools and communities around the world) has created a Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module for the LST Middle School program. A study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) showed that the LST Middle School program delivered in 7th grade classrooms helped students avoid abusing prescriptions, opioids, and other drugs throughout their teen years. This new module can be used as a standalone module or as part of the LST Middle School program.

Contributing Writer: Alexandrea Adams is a senior at Dartmouth College studying Biology and Public Policy. She is currently interning at National Health Promotion Associates.

 

 


New Prescription Drug Module to Help Shield Teens from Opioid Crisis

August 25, 2017

Schools and communities are searching for new tools to combat the prescription drug and opioid crisis, now regarded as a national emergency. National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA), the researchers behind Botvin LifeSkills Training, have risen to the challenge of helping youth avoid the dangers of prescription drug or opioid misuse/abuse and are excited to announce the release of a Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module.

presc-drug-burst

The new LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module gives teens the skills and knowledge necessary to help them avoid the misuse/abuse of opioids and prescription drugs.   It will be available in a variety of formats that will allow for both online and classroom delivery. The new module is ideal for school districts, community-based organizations, and agencies serving students ages 11 – 14.    The module is flexible enough to enhance the award-winning Botvin LifeSkills Trainingprogram or to be integrated into existing prevention programming.

The new module is designed to further enhance the effectiveness of the LST Middle School program, which has been proven to reduce opioid and prescription drug misuse.   A study funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) showed that the LST Middle School program delivered in 7th grade classrooms helped students avoid misusing/abusing prescriptions opioids and other drugs throughout their teen years. NHPA researchers say that the addition of this new module will reinforce the already effective LST program.

“NHPA is a leader in quality, effective evidence-based prevention education.  While our core Middle School program already has evidence demonstrating its effectiveness in reducing opioid and prescription drug misuse and abuse, the addition of this new module will help to specifically address the epidemic facing our nation.   The LST program has been tested through more than 30 years of rigorous scientific research and has identified prevention approaches that are effective, produce lasting results, and can save taxpayers a good deal of money,” said Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin, professor emeritus at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College and developer of the LST program. “Let’s stop prescription opioid abuse before it begins. Now is the time to unleash the power of prevention.”

More than 35 federally funded studies have demonstrated that LST protects teens against tobacco, alcohol, substance use, and other problem behaviors such as delinquency and violence. According to a 2013 report on the economic benefit of evidence-based prevention programs, LST produced a $38 benefit for every $1 invested in terms of reduced corrections costs, welfare and social services burden, drug and mental health treatment; and increased employment and tax revenue. LST had the highest return on investment of all substance abuse prevention curricula studied.

About Botvin LifeSkills Training
Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) is a highly acclaimed, evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program used in schools and communities. LST has been extensively tested and proven to reduce tobacco, alcohol, opioid, and illicit drug use by as much as 80%. Long-term follow-up studies also show that it produces prevention effects that are durable and long-lasting.  Visit www.lifeskillstraining.com for more information.


Drug Prevention Education is Key to End Opioid Epidemic

August 15, 2017

rxThe opioid crisis is now a national emergency, and we’re here to help prevent the abuse before it begins. Join us on a free webinar to learn about the all NEW LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module that provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to avoid the abuse of opioids and prescription drugs. The module will be available in both digital and print formats to allow for use in a variety of educational or implementation settings.

We hope you will join us on this webinar to learn about this exciting new prevention tool for teachers and facilitators to use with the youth they serve. Click link to register (Space is limited)

 

 

Duration:  30 minutes

Click link to register:   Three dates to choose from (space is limited)

  • TUESDAY, AUG 15, 2017
  • THURSDAY, AUG 17, 2017
  • TUESDAY, AUG 22, 2017

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


LifeSkills Training Module to Prevent Prescription Drug & Opioid Abuse

August 14, 2017

Webinar:  Opioid and prescription drug abuse is an epidemic that demands our immediate attention.  At Botvin LifeSkills Training  (LST) we are putting our experience, expertise, and resources to work helping schools and community agencies prevent youth from abusing prescription drugs, including opioids.   MS-PDA

The new LST Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Module provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to avoid the abuse of opioids and prescription drugs.  This new module will enhance the documented effects of the LST Middle School program.  A study funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) showed that the LST Middle School program delivered in 7th grade classrooms helped students avoid abusing prescriptions opioids and other drugs throughout their teen years.

We hope you will join us to learn about this exciting new prevention tool for teachers and facilitators to use with the youth they serve.  The module will be available in both digital and print formats to allow for use in a variety of educational or implementation settings.

Duration:  30 minutes

Click link to register:   Three dates to choose from (space is limited)

  • TUESDAY, AUG 15, 2017 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM EDT
  • THURSDAY, AUG 17, 2017 10:00 AM – 10:30 AM EDT
  • TUESDAY, AUG 22, 2017 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDT

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


CDC Report Shows Promising Drop in Teen Tobacco Use

August 3, 2017

@CADCA repost…

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gives prevention advocates a reason to celebrate: youth tobacco use has hit a new low. The study found:

  • The estimated number of middle and high school students who are tobacco users dropped from 4.7 million in 2015 to 3.9 million in 2016.
  • Just 8 percent of high-school students smoked cigarettes last year, while a little over 20 percent reported using “any tobacco product,” which includes cigars, hookahs, pipes, smokeless tobacco and small, leaf-wrapped cigarettes called bidis, as well as regular and e-cigarettes.

Teenagers’ use of e-cigarettes fell sharply last year – 11.3 percent of high school students used e-cigarettes in 2016, compared with 16 percent the year before. This marks the first drop since the CDC started tracking e-cigarettes in 2011.


What’s a Proven Drug Prevention Program for Schools?

August 2, 2017

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

sg-e1501170172246.png

The Surgeon General’s office named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.The program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, and will change the lives of the youth for the better.

Interested in learning more? Join us on this free webinar to explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 2:00 PM EDT

Click to register: https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/350801768122382081

 


Unsatisfactory Student Safety: A Demand for Sexual Violence Prevention in College

July 21, 2017

endOver the last few years, there has been a surge in news articles about college campus sexual violence. Numerous students have reached out to their educational institutions to voice their concerns and demand action. Among undergraduate students, 23.1% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation (Cantor, Fisher, Chibnall, Townsend, et al., 2015). To make matters worse, more than 90% of sexual assault victims on college campuses do not report the assault (Fisher, Cullen, & Turner, 2000).

There is currently no federal law that mandates schools to implement an educational sexual violence prevention program. Unfortunately, only 25 states mandate that their public educational institutions present some sort of education around sexual assault (National Public Radio, 2016).

There is hope for students as more politicians are becoming concerned; sexual violence prevention program implementation on campuses is steadily increasing. Just recently, Massachusetts State Senator Michael Moore introduced a bill that would address sexual violence on college campuses in the state (Calabro, 2017). The bill would require all students and staff to receive annual sexual violence prevention and awareness programming. Nonetheless, there is much more work to be done in order to ensure the safety of our nation’s students.

One organization taking this topic seriously is National Health Promotion Associates, which developed the evidence-based Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) programs that are proven to reduce violence and many other risky behaviors. LST is currently developing a program for college campuses that wish to improve their campus safety. The program focuses on:

  • A holistic approach that will help students develop life skills necessary to thrive in school
  • Raising awareness of how substance abuse can be a risk factor for sexual violence
  • Clarifying the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships
  • Educating students on various topics such as what constitutes consent and information on bystander intervention
  • Providing strategies and techniques to help students in risky or uncomfortable situations

Sources:

Calabro, J. (2017, June 08). News | Moore’s Bill Addressing Campus Sexual Violence Voted Unanimously to Advance. Retrieved June 29, 2017, from http://www.golocalworcester.com/news/moores-bill-addressing-campus-sexual-violence-voted-unanimously-to-advance

Cantor D., Fisher B., Chibnall S., Townsend R, Lee H., Bruce C., Thomas G. (2015). Report on the AAU campus climate survey of sexual assault and sexual misconduct. Rockville, MD: Westat.

Fisher, B.S., Cullen, F.T., & Turner, M.G. (2000). The sexual victimization of college women. National Institutes of Justice: Bureau of Justice Statistics.

National Public Radio. (2016, August 09). To Prevent Sexual Assault, Schools And  Parents Start Lessons Early. Retrieved June 29, 2017, from http://www.npr.org/2016/08/09/487497208/to-prevent-sexual-assault-schools-and-parents-start-lessons-early

 

Writer: Gabriela Rodrigues is a graduate of State University of New York College at Oneonta with a B.A. in Psychology and a Minor in Child Development. She will attend Columbia University this fall to pursue her Masters in Psychology.


Weeding Out the Facts: The Implications of Legalizing Marijuana

July 12, 2017

In recent years, the legalization of marijuana use has become a high-profile topic of discussion across the United States. In 2012, Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational usage of marijuana for adults 21 and over. In following years, other states have legalized medical or recreational marijuana usage or decriminalized it, changing usage trends across the country. The long-term impacts of these changing laws are yet to be seen, but what can we learn from the few years that have passed?

Researchers have looked at Colorado and noticed some changes in public health trends since 2012. Two highlights:

  • mjA 2016 report compared previous years’ results from the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The report showed a large difference in Colorado youth (ages 12 to 17) marijuana usage compared to the national average. From 2013-2014, the percentage of Colorado youth who had used marijuana in the previous month was 74% higher than the national average.
  • A report published in 2017 showed that Colorado hospital records indicate a marked increase in marijuana-related visits. The study found that among 13-21 year olds, the number of marijuana-related visits to the emergency department (ED) and other urgent care centers rose from 146 in 2005 to 639 in 2014.

These numbers suggest that not only are adolescents more at risk because of increased access to marijuana, but also more healthcare resources are needed to respond to these risks. As time passes, it will be interesting to see how Colorado and other states respond to the changing public health needs of their communities. In fact, when discussing the findings about changes in marijuana-related ED visits, the study’s lead researcher George Sam Wang stressed that “targeted marijuana education and prevention strategies are necessary to reduce the significant public health impact” of marijuana usage on adolescent populations.

One company heavily involved in prevention is National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA), whose LifeSkills Training programs target the prevention of substance use, prescription drug abuse, and sexual violence for elementary school, middle school, high school, and college students. NHPA has also introduced an online workshop (check our online calendar for current dates) specific to teaching marijuana prevention. Workshops like these are key elements in addressing changes in adolescent mental health related to marijuana usage.

Writer: Genevieve Martin is a rising senior at Boston College studying Psychology. She also works as a Health Coach in the Office of Health Promotion (OHP) where she teaches and coaches students about stress and time management along with other general health and wellness strategies. 

 

 

 

 

 


Are you trained to teach evidence-based prevention?

July 11, 2017

Provider Training Workshops (online) teacher-students-smThese workshops prepare teachers, school counselors, prevention specialists, police officers, community youth educators, and other program providers to effectively implement the state-of-the-art prevention education activities and teaching strategies found in the LifeSkills Training program.

  • 7/11  Transitions program
  • 7/12  Elementary program
  • 7/18  Middle School program
  • 7/26  Parent Program Leader Training
  • 8/3    High School program

Click here for full Summer schedule (check back for future dates).

 

Provider Training Workshops (on-site) Do you have a group that needs to be trained to deliver the LifeSkills Training program? We can send a trainer directly to your site. For a quote, email training@nhpamail.com or call 800-293-4969.

 

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Trainer of Trainers (TOT) This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct LifeSkills Training workshops for your organization.  Eligibility limited to those who complete Provider Training workshop and implement the LST program for at least one full cycle.

Greater New York City area: 
July 13 – 14, 2017 (only one spot left!)
or November 2 – 3, 2017


Interact For Health Offering Grants for LifeSkills to Prevent Tobacco Use

July 6, 2017

Interact for Health announced today in honor of the local foundation’s 20th Anniversary, it is seeking grant applications from each of the 20-counties in the Greater Cincinnati region.  Organizations in each county will be awarded up to $20,000 to help advance Interact’s targeted goal of reducing use of tobacco in low-income communities. The term tobacco use includes, but is not limited to cigarettes, cigars, vaping, hookah, e-cigarettes, and chewing tobacco.

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More 16 million Americans have at least one disease caused by smoking, which equals $170 billion in direct medical costs every year. The smoking rates in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana are all higher than the national average, and the rates are significantly higher for low-income and minority populations. Despite declining universal smoking rates great health disparities still exist. Individuals with less than a high school education, below the Federal Poverty Level, and who live in rural locations are using tobacco at significantly higher rates than the national average.

“Historically, tobacco prevention efforts have not focused on our poorest communities, which has left huge disparities,” said Owens. “To move towards the goal of having the healthiest region in the country, we need to reduce tobacco use in every community and in every county.”

An organization in each of the 20-county service region will be awarded one grant. Each grant award will provide $20,000 to an organization to reduce tobacco use. Grant awards will be announced during Interact for Heath’s 20th Anniversary celebration this fall.  Examples of tobacco prevention as well as tobacco-free environment projects that could be funded under this RFA are:

  • planning and implementation of policies,
  • developing coalitions, advocacy strategies and social marketing campaigns.
  • implementing school/community prevention programs (e.g. LifeSkills, CoreLife, etc.),
  • implementing or developing innovative program ideas, or
  • developing strategies to engage hard-to-reach portions of the community.

Application Process

Complete and submit the request for application (RFA) form to proposals@interactforhealth.org by 5PM on August 2, 2017. An informational workshop will be held on July 18th from 1PM to 3PM at Interact for Health, 3805 Edwards Rd, Suite 500, Cincinnati, OH 45209. This event will also be available via live stream.

Applicants must be a non-profit community agency, school or a governmental entity located in or serving one of the 20 counties of Interact’s service area. Some projects involving unincorporated or for-profit entities may be feasible in collaboration with a qualified non-profit fiscal sponsor.  For complete details and to download the application, visit www.interactforhealth.org.

Application deadline is 8/2/17


Do you want to learn why LifeSkills Training is the most effective prevention program in schools?

July 5, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST)  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.


Summer workshops: “Teaching Marijuana Prevention”

June 27, 2017

Join us for an online professional development workshop where we will:

  • Examine trends in the social & legal acceptance of marijuana in the US
  • Consider effective strategies in responding to learners
  • Develop specific responses to challenging questions that may arise in school and community education settings

Register for a 2-part workshop in July or September. Space is limited.

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Online workshop: “Teaching Marijuana Prevention”

June 6, 2017

Join us for this online professional development workshop on 6/9 where we will:

  • Examine trends in the social & legal acceptance of marijuana in the US
  • Consider effective strategies in responding to learners
  • Develop specific responses to challenging questions that may arise in school and community education settings

Space is limited. Click here to register

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Free Webinar: How LifeSkills Training can Keep Kids Healthy and Drug-free (space is limited)

May 23, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST)  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016


Free Webinar: How LifeSkills Training can Keep Kids Healthy and Drug-free (space is limited)

April 27, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST)  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016


South Carolina Tobacco-Free Collaborative Offering Mini-grants for Botvin LifeSkills Training

April 26, 2017

smoker-life-insurance-quoteThe South Carolina Tobacco-Free Collaborative provides Youth and Young Adult Prevention Grants to coalitions and organizations to implement programs that are designed to prevent tobacco use initiation among youth and young adults and address current use of tobacco products. This competitive funding opportunity provides awards to local community-based organizations that support the mission of the South Carolina Tobacco-Free Collaborative and are designed to invest in projects that address goals of the state plan, Ending the Epidemic: Plan for a Tobacco-Free South Carolina, 2015-2020. For more information, visit www.sctobaccofree.org.

Click here for Mini-grant funding opportunity.


Cape Cod Foundation Accepting Grant Proposals for Teen Programs

April 25, 2017

YARMOUTH PORT – The Cape Cod Foundation is now accepting grant proposals from local organizations trying to positively impact teenagers on Cape Cod.

The Foundation’s Cape Youth Force, made up of teenagers from Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School, will review the applications and will award $1,000 to support projects and programs aimed at dealing with issues faced by local teens.

This year’s committee has said they are willing to fund a wide range of programs, from wildlife protection to substance abuse prevention and awareness.

The Cape Youth Force was founded in 2004 and is described as the only organization of its kind on Cape Cod.

“We hope to show students how rewarding community service is by engaging them in the grant-making process,” said Kristin O’Malley, the Executive Director of the Cape Cod Foundation. “We also encourage members of the community to contribute directly to the Community for Young People fund to enhance the students’ impact in the community.”

More information on how to apply for grant funding can be found at capecodfoundation.org.

The deadline for applications is May 10.


How is Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Supported through Botvin LifeSkills Training?

March 29, 2017

Join us on this live webinar to learn more!  Space is very limited so register early to reserve your spot.

Webinar: This webinar is designed to look at the LifeSkills Training (LST) program and the outcomes related to the five core competencies of social and emotional learning (SEL).

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Under the federal education law, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), schools can expand their SEL programs that teach children self-control, to resolve conflicts, and to make responsible decisions and avoid risky behaviors.  Research shows that these “soft skills” benefit children for their entire lives and can have a positive impact on schools.

Join us to learn how LifeSkills Training (LST) not only supports SEL competencies but also promotes healthy alternatives to risky behavior through activities designed to teach students the necessary skills to resist social (peer) pressures.  LST helps students develop greater self-esteem and self-confidence, enables students to effectively cope with anxiety, and enhances their decision-making and problem-solving skills.

Duration:  60 minutes

About the presenter: A graduate of Penn State University, Kim Williams is committed to enhancing the lives of youth with her extensive background in evidence-based prevention program implementation. A dynamic professional who has worked in schools, non-profits, and university statewide support organizations, Kim currently trains future implementers of the LifeSkills Training program as part of the National Health Promotion Associates national training cadre.  Kim has focused on social and emotional learning through her work with the Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies (PATHS®) program as a national and international trainer.  Her focus concentrates on translating evidence-based program research practices into best practices in community and school setting program implementation.

Register for this webinar:   Tuesday, April 11, 2017 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT . After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Space is limited.


Prescription Drugs: The Escalation of Use and Abuse

March 28, 2017

“It’s becoming a sadly common story. People get prescribed painkillers. They become addicted and they seek out cheaper and more potent drugs like heroin and synthetic opioids.” –Lulu Garcia Navarro, Family member of an opioid victim, NPR News (2017)

Throughout the United States, prescription drug abuse has become a major public health concern.

rx.jpgIn 2015, research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that, between 2002 and 2013, the rate of heroin-related overdose deaths nearly quadrupled. Findings have indicated that the two distinct but interconnected trends that are driving America’s opioid overdose epidemic include:

  • an increase in prescribed opioid drugs
  • a recent surge in illicit opioid overdoses, driven mainly by heroin and illegally-made Fentanyl

The use of highly addictive opioid prescription drugs has repercussions that extend far beyond the individual user. Economic consequences include its impact on work and educational productivity as well as the cost of treatment and incarceration. According to a 2011 study by the American Public Health Association, in 2006, “nonmedical use of prescription painkillers imposed a cost of $53.4 billion on the US economy, including $42 billion in lost productivity, $8.2 billion in increased criminal justice costs, $2.2 billion for drug abuse treatment, and $944 million in medical complications” (AHPA, 2015).

Although a variety of treatments are available for heroin and prescription drug addiction, it is also vital and far more cost effective to help prevent the health risk behaviors related to opioid drug abuse. Botvin LifeSkills Training is an effective skills-based and evidence-based prevention program that can be utilized as a strategic measure to combat the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse. And now, National Health Promotion Associates, the researchers behind LifeSkills Training, has developed a middle school prescription drug abuse prevention program. The program utilizes both digital and face-to-face intervention modalities to help young adults learn healthy behavioral social and self-regulation skills such as managing stress and anxiety, as well as drug resistance skills. “The combination of drug resistance skills and life skills has been proven to be a powerful formula for preventing drug use and can be carried over throughout their teen years” (Botvin, 2016).

According to research conducted by the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) the use of effective prevention programs like LifeSkills Training have shown to produce a  50-to-1 return, which has been noted as the highest return on investment of any substance abuse prevention curriculum studied.

It has never been a more important time to continue to pressure our legislative representatives, public health agencies, and school administrators to implement programs like LifeSkills Training as a means to help young adults make healthy choices and avoid the damaging effects of prescription drug use and abuse.

Contributing Writer: Madeline Liongson recently graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Development and Family Studies as well as a Minor in Psychology. Her previous volunteer experience includes working with a wide range of students and healthcare professionals from diverse populations in Connecticut, New York and London, UK. Currently Madeline serves as the youngest Youth Board Member for the American Red Cross in the Metro New York Territory and works as a part-time Administrative Assistant at a Speech Language Pathology and Social Development center while she is pursuing a Master’s Degree in Public Health.


Can prevention programs make an impact in high school?

March 27, 2017

Yes! Research shows that drug prevention also works with High School students!

HS no bgstudy published in the World Journal of Preventive Medicine found that the LifeSkills Training High School Program:

  • cuts drug abuse in half
  • works with a broad range of students
  • is a cost-effective approach to a major public health problem

Do you want to get trained to teach this program in your school/community? Register for the online training workshop on April 5, 2017. Space is limited so register early and save.

 


Up to $10 million in “Resiliency in Communities After Stress & Trauma” Grants Available from SAMHSA

March 23, 2017

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is accepting applications for Resiliency in Communities after Stress and Trauma (ReCAST) grants totaling up to $10 million over the course of five years.

moneyThe purpose of this program is to assist high-risk youth and families and promote resilience and equity in communities that have recently faced civil unrest through implementation of evidence-based, violence prevention, and community youth engagement programs. The grants will also help promote access to trauma-informed behavioral health services.

SAMHSA expects to award up to two grantees up to $1 million each annually. The length of the project period will be up to five years, with projected available funding totaling $10 million. The actual amount may vary, depending on the availability of funds.

WHO MAY APPLY: Eligible applicants are municipalities, including counties, cities, and other local governments, in partnership with community-based organizations in communities that have faced civil unrest in the past 24 months. See Section III-1 of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for complete eligibility information.

HOW TO APPLY: You must go to http://www.grants.gov and the SAMHSA website http://www.samhsa.gov/grants/applying to download the required documents to apply for this SAMHSA grant. Your application must be submitted through http://www.Grants.gov. Please refer to PART II, Section I-1 and Section II-1 of the FOA for registration requirements.

APPLICATION DUE DATE: May 17, 2017 by 11:59 pm Eastern time. Applications must be received by the due date and time to be considered for review. Please carefully review Part II of the FOA, Section IV for application and submission requirements.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Applicants with questions about program issues should contact Melodye Watson at (240) 276-1748 or recast@samhsa.hhs.gov(link sends e-mail). For questions on grants management issues contact Gwen Simpson at (240) 276-1408 or FOACMHS@samhsa.hhs.gov(link sends e-mail).

 

For more information, contact the SAMHSA Press Office at 240-276-2130.


Funding available for drug prevention programs> Deadlines approaching!

March 14, 2017
money
Below is a list of funding opportunities that may be applicable for the Botvin LifeSkills Training program.
For more detailed information on each funding opportunity and contact information click here.
 
FUNDING FOR BOTVIN LIFESKILLS TRAINING IN PENNSYLVANIA
The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) is accepting applications for Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support a targeted group of evidence-based programs proven to be effective in reducing risk factors and increasing protective factors.   The 2017 Funding Announcement includes a list of programs eligible for funding under this announcement including Botvin LifeSkills Training.
Application deadline is 3/14/17
 

 

DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM GRANT
The FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities Support Program funding opportunity by the Office of National Drug Control Policy anticipates award amounts up to $125,000. The DFC Support Program establishes and strengthens collaboration among communities, public and private non-profit agencies; as well as federal, state, local, and tribal governments to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance use among youth.
Application deadline is 3/15/17
 

 

GOOD SHEPHERD GRANTS FOR NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA 
The Good Shepherd Fund, Inc. offers grants to community agencies for substance abuse prevention and education.  Community agencies in Columbus, Bladen, Robeson, New Hanover and Brunswick counties in North Carolina and Horry County of South Carolina are eligible for grant funds.  Each year mini grants are awarded on a competitive basis to selected non-profit or governmental agencies.
Application deadline is 3/15/17
 

 

GRANT PROJECTS AIMED AT PREVENTING SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN IDAHO
The Idaho Office of Drug Policy (ODP) is accepting applications for grant projects aimed at preventing substance abuse. Public entities and non-profit organizations are eligible for funding and encouraged to apply for grants totaling about $1.6 million annually to Idaho communities for substance abuse prevention programs.  ODP endorses Prevention education and training that provides specific skills to participants.

Application deadline is 3/24/17

 

 

$3.6 MILLION AVAILABLE FOR BOTVIN LIFESKILLS TRAINING IN ARIZONA
The Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family announced the release of a competitive grant solicitation in a Request for Grant Application for the Arizona High School Health and Wellness Program. The goal of the program is to prevent the onset of underage drinking, marijuana use, and prescription drug misuse and abuse by utilizing evidence based programs. Research has identified Botvin LifeSkills Training as an approved program under this grant.
Application deadline is 4/4/17
 

 

VIRGINIA ABC OFFERS ALCOHOL PREVENTION GRANT
In an effort to encourage and support the development of alcohol education and prevention programs across the commonwealth, the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is accepting applications for its 2017-2018 Education and Prevention Grant awards. Grant awards will be limited to a maximum of $8,000 per recipient. Community coalitions, law enforcement agencies, nonprofits, schools, faith-based organizations and prevention groups are encouraged to apply.
Application deadline is 4/25/17
 

 

DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION FUND ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS IN ILLINOIS
The Freeport Community Foundation announces that the John M. Drogosz Youth Substance Abuse Prevention/Treatment Memorial Fund will award  grants for educational, prevention, and/or substance abuse treatment programs focused on helping youth age 21 or younger in Freeport, Illinois. Grant amounts vary on a project-by-project basis. To be eligible, organizations must have 501(c)(3) status.
Application deadline is 6/1/17

Cutting the Costs: Prevention is worth the investment

March 2, 2017

There’s an old saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” when referring to health-related issues. Preventive measures such as health education or health screenings have been shown to help combat major public health issues and be cost-effective in the long-term.

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The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reported that in 2015, tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug abuse cost the United States more than $700 billion in expenses related to:

  • Crime
  • Lost work productivity
  • Health care

According to the National Institutes of Health, to ensure that high-quality disease prevention research is being used to improve the health of all Americans, it is important to apply evidence-based research when making decisions and designing programs and interventions. The Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program has been tested in a series of randomized trials and found effective in preventing cigarette smoking, alcohol, and drug use as well as other risky health behaviors in youth.

What makes LST stand out from other abuse prevention programs is it’s curriculum focusing on topics that support resisting the pressure to use drugs, such as developing a strong self-image and skills in decision making and communication.

Researchers found that the program produced as much as a $50 benefit to communities for every $1 invested –yielding the highest return of any substance abuse prevention curriculum studied.

The implementation process is also user friendly and convenient in that there are:

  • Interactive delivery methods
  • Brief provider trainings
  • Convenient online exercises

Therefore, when working to combat the substance abuse epidemic in the U.S., it is important that health professionals and policymakers focus not only on the health benefits of prevention but also become aware of the potential economic benefits of different prevention methods in order to make informed decisions for funding and resources.

 

Contributing Writer: Christina Auth recently graduated from Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina with a Bachelor of Science in Public Health and a minor in Sociology.  She is currently interested in global health issues and has studied abroad in countries such as Australia, Barbados, and South Africa observing and researching from an ecological perspective; rural health issues, tropical diseases, and the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Christina is passionate about epidemiology and environmental health issues that affect diverse communities.  Some of her career aspirations include getting her Masters of Public Health, working for the Peace Corps., and becoming a college professor. In her free time she likes to go on hikes near her house because South Carolina was extremely flat or travel to visit friends in other cities.  She is a huge soup fanatic and loves the band Coldplay.


Webinar: How LifeSkills Training can Keep Kids Healthy and Drug-free

February 21, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST)  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016


How to Become a LifeSkills Trainer of Trainers (TOT)

February 20, 2017

tot

Step 1 – Attend a provider training workshop (online or in person).

Step 2 – Implement any level of the LifeSkills Training program for one full cycle.

Step 3 – Fill out the TOT application and email it to training@nhpamail.com

Step 4 – Once your application has been approved, you can register for the next TOT workshop: Greater NYC Area: March 30-31, 2017*

This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) workshops for your organization.  Eligibility is limited to those who complete an LST workshop and implement the program for at least one full semester.

 *Space is very limited; please register early.


Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Grant Money Available

February 16, 2017

Below is a list of funding opportunities that may be applicable for the LifeSkills Training program.  For more detailed information on each funding opportunity and contact information click here.

 

FUNDING FOR BOTVIN LIFESKILLS TRAINING IN PENNSYLVANIA – The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) is accepting applications for Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support a targeted group of evidence-based programs proven to be effective in reducing risk factors and increasing protective factors.  The 2017 Funding Announcement includes a list of programs eligible for funding under this announcement including Botvin LifeSkills Training.

Application deadline is 3/14/17

DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM GRANT – The FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities Support Program funding opportunity by the Office of National Drug Control Policy anticipates award amounts up to $125,000. The DFC Support Program establishes and strengthens collaboration among communities, public and private non-profit agencies; as well as federal, state, local, and tribal governments to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance use among youth.

Application deadline is 3/15/17

GOOD SHEPHERD GRANTS FOR NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA – The Good Shepherd Fund, Inc. offers grants to community agencies for substance abuse prevention and education. Community agencies in Columbus, Bladen, Robeson, New Hanover and Brunswick counties in North Carolina and Horry County of South Carolina are eligible for grant funds. Each year mini grants are awarded on a competitive basis to selected non-profit or governmental agencies.

Application deadline is 3/15/17

GRANT PROJECTS AIMED AT PREVENTING SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN IDAHO – The Idaho Office of Drug Policy (ODP) is accepting applications for grant projects aimed at preventing substance abuse. Public entities and non-profit organizations are eligible for funding and encouraged to apply for grants totaling about $1.6 million annually to Idaho communities for substance abuse prevention programs. ODP endorses Prevention education and training that provides specific skills to participants.

Application deadline is 3/24/17

$3.6 MILLION AVAILABLE FOR BOTVIN LIFESKILLS TRAINING IN ARIZONA – The Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family announced the release of a competitive grant solicitation in a Request for Grant Application for the Arizona High School Health and Wellness Program. The goal of the program is to prevent the onset of underage drinking, marijuana use, and prescription drug misuse and abuse by utilizing evidence based programs. Research has identified Botvin LifeSkills Training as an approved program under this grant.

Application deadline is 4/4/17

VIRGINIA ABC OFFERS ALCOHOL PREVENTION GRANT – In an effort to encourage and support the development of alcohol education and prevention programs across the commonwealth, the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is accepting applications for its 2017-2018 Education and Prevention Grant awards. Grant awards will be limited to a maximum of $8,000 per recipient. Community coalitions, law enforcement agencies, nonprofits, schools, faith-based organizations and prevention groups are encouraged to apply.

Application deadline is 4/25/17

DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION FUND ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS IN ILLINOIS – The Freeport Community Foundation announces that the John M. Drogosz Youth Substance Abuse Prevention/Treatment Memorial Fund will award  grants for educational, prevention, and/or substance abuse treatment programs focused on helping youth age 21 or younger in Freeport, Illinois. Grant amounts vary on a project-by-project basis. To be eligible, organizations must have 501(c)(3) status.

Application deadline is 6/1/17


$3.6 Million In Grant Funding Available For High School Drug Prevention

February 13, 2017

money.jpgThe Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family announced the release of a competitive grant solicitation in a Request for Grant Application for the Arizona High School Health and Wellness Program. The goal of the program is to prevent the onset of underage drinking, marijuana use, and prescription drug misuse and abuse by utilizing evidence based programs.

Successful Applicants who are selected for award shall also implement the prevention education strategy using evidence-based and evidence-informed curricula to high school students. Research has identified Botvin LifeSkills Training as an approved program under this grant.

Eligibility: Arizona High Schools (public and charter), serving 9-12 grade levels.

Prospective Applicants are encouraged to attend a pre-application conference on February 21, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. (Arizona time) at the State Health Laboratory Building, 250 N. 17th Avenue, First Floor Conference Room, Phoenix, Arizona 85007.  The purpose of the conference is to discuss and clarify this Request for Grant Application (“RFGA”).

For more information visit: http://substanceabuse.az.gov/substance-abuse/grants.

Applications are due 4/4/17


Funding Available for LifeSkills Training in Pennsylvania

February 10, 2017

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) is accepting applications for Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support a targeted group of evidence-based programs. Because a substantial body of research exists on the causes and correlates of adolescent problem behaviors, implementing programs that are effective in preventing adolescent problem behaviors continues to be a priority within PCCD. Risk and protective factors related to these behaviors have been identified in many Pennsylvania communities through local community assessments. Supported by strong evaluations, many prevention programs designed to reduce or eliminate risk factors and facilitate protective factors have already been implemented across the Commonwealth.PCCDLogo-2C

To enable communities to implement such programs, PCCD is making available State Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support evidence-based prevention programs. This funding is intended for new program implementations, expansions of an existing program into a new and distinct geographic area, or for the support of Big Brothers Big Sisters Program Operations. This funding is meant to help enable communities to build upon existing adolescent problem behavior prevention efforts that were developed through collaborative risk-focused prevention approaches.

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) – Middle School is eligible for funding under this announcement.

All applications must be submitted electronically through PCCD’s Egrants System no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. The Egrants Help Desk is available to assist with questions until 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Contact the PCCD Egrants Help Desk at (717) 787-5887 or by email at: RA-eGrantsSupport@pa.gov.

Application deadline is 3/14/17


$1.6 million in Grants available to Idaho Communities for Drug prevention

February 3, 2017

The Idaho Office of Drug Policy (ODP) is now accepting applications for grant projects aimed at preventing substance abuse in Idaho. Public entities and non-profit organizations are eligible for funding and encouraged to apply for grants totaling about $1.6 million annually to Idaho communities for substance abuse prevention programs.“We are excited to continue funding this grant program focused on the primary prevention of substance abuse,” ODP Administrator Elisha Figueroa said. “We know that the implementation of evidence-based prevention strategies by passionate, dedicated prevention providers and community members make Idaho a safer and healthier place to live, work and recreate. What’s more, these folks save lives.”

The federal grant funding is intended for direct service programs and community programs/activities designed to reduce the impact of substance abuse on Idaho youth, families and communities. The program’s goal is to create healthy environments by implementing comprehensive strategies for promoting positive, sustainable and lasting change. ODP endorses the following prevention strategies:

• Information dissemination about the nature and extent of drug use, abuse, addiction and the effects on individuals, families and communities.

Prevention education and training that provides specific skills to participants.

• Alternative activities for youth that exclude drug use and promote healthy lifestyles.

• Community-based processes that enhance the community’s ability to more effectively provide prevention services.

• Environmental strategies that establish or change community standards, codes, laws, policies, norms and attitudes, thereby influencing consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in communities.

• Problem identification and referral to identify those who may be misusing or abusing substances in order to provide resources and refer them to treatment, if necessary.

ODP recognizes that local communities are powerful places to shape the health, safety and well-being of children and families, so it strives to support evidence-based programs that impact every region of Idaho. To advance those programs, the agency will accept grant applications for fiscal year 2018 until March 24.


Groundhog Day or Hedgehog Day?

February 2, 2017

National Geographic News talks about Groundhog Day, Punxsutawney Phil, and the weather. They include a look at the origins of February 2nd forecasting, which began with the Roman Empire, when folks considered the weather on Candlemas to predict future weather.

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(LifeSkills mascot “Squillex” the Hedgehog predicts healthy and drug-free youth)

Legend has it that the Romans also believed that conditions during the first days of February were good predictors of future weather, but the empire looked to hedgehogs for their forecasts.

These two traditions melded in Germany and were brought over to the United States by German immigrants who settled in Pennsylvania. Lacking hedgehogs, the German settlers substituted native groundhogs in the ritual, and Groundhog Day was born.

So have we’ve been using the wrong animal all these years? Should we instead say “Happy Hedgehog Day”?


Can parents help prevent drug-use and risky behavior in their kids?

January 27, 2017

Overwhelmingly YES! A study in the Journal of Child and Family Studies shows that family-based prevention programs can be an effective way to prevent adolescent substance use.

parent-workshop(Deerfield, IL Schools hosting LifeSkills Parent workshops, January 2017)

The LifeSkills Training Parent Program is proven to help families by strengthening family communication. Topics covered in the program include:

  • Family Communication
  • Parental Monitoring
  • Being a Good Role Model
  • Use of Appropriate and Consistent Discipline
  • Effects and Warning Signs of Substance Abuse
  • Taking a Clear Stand on Drugs

The program helps keep children from using drugs and engaging in risky behavior, is ideal for parenting workshops and is available in Spanish too.

Do you want to learn how to host these LifeSkills Parent workshops in your community? Register for this online training workshop on February 6th and become a LifeSkills Training Parent Program Leader.

Prevention works when schools, families, and communities come together!

 


Want to learn about how LifeSkills can keep kids healthy & Drug-free?

January 26, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST)  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016


Free webinar: LifeSkills for Middle School prevention education

January 25, 2017

Join us for this complimentary webinar to learn more about the how the LifeSkills Training Middle School Program can positively impact educational outcomes, reduce violence, and decrease alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and opioid use as well as other drug use.

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Two dates to choose from.  Click the link to register:

LifeSkills Training (LST) is an evidence-based substance abuse and violence prevention program that has been extensively tested and proven to reduce drug use by as much as 80%. Long-term follow-up studies show that it produces prevention effects that are durable and long-lasting.

The Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18*

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016


High school isn’t too late for drug prevention

January 24, 2017

Research shows that drug prevention also works with High School students!

HS no bgstudy published in the World Journal of Preventive Medicine found that the LifeSkills Training High School Program:

  • cuts drug abuse in half
  • works with a broad range of students
  • is a cost-effective approach to a major public health problem

Do you want to get trained to teach this program in your school/community? Register for the 2-part online training workshop on February 1st and 2nd. Space is limited so register early and save.

 


Surgeon General names LifeSkills Training as one of the most effective school-based programs

January 23, 2017

Recently the U.S. Surgeon General released a landmark report on the addiction epidemic in this country asking communities to focus on evidence-based prevention. The report titled Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health named the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program as an effective prevention program for adolescents aged 10 to 18.

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The Surgeon General’s Office reviewed nearly 600 programs and cited only 42 programs as evidence-based, that is – proven scientifically effective. LifeSkills Training was highlighted as one of three of the most effective school-based program for kids ages 10-18.

According to the report, effective prevention programs can delay early use, stop the progression to addiction, and avoid the need for treatment. After an extensive review of published research studies, the Surgeon General identified LST as a prevention program that successfully reduces the number of people who start using alcohol or drugs.  “One well-researched and widely used program is LifeSkills Training, a school-based program delivered over 3 years. Research has shown that this training delayed early use of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances…”


Good Shepherd grant deadline is March 15

January 17, 2017

LAKE WACCAMAW — The Good Shepherd Fund, Inc. is a non-profit board comprised of community members interested in the prevention of substance abuse and operates off the interest earned from the sale of the Good Shepherd Home at Lake Waccamaw. The investment interest is to be distributed in the form of grants to community agencies for substance abuse prevention and education.

Community agencies in Columbus, Bladen, Robeson, New Hanover and Brunswick counties in North Carolina and Horry County of South Carolina are eligible for grant funds.

The Good Shepherd Fund is dedicated to helping fund non-profit organizations that supply intervention and/or prevention of alcohol and substance abuse. Each year mini grants are awarded on a competitive basis to selected non-profit or governmental agencies. Applications with original signatures must be received by 5 p.m. on March 15. For an electronic version of the application, e-mail amanda.formyduval@sccnc.edu or call 910-642-7141, Ext. 260.


Drug-Free Community (DFC) Funding

January 13, 2017

The Fiscal Year 2017 Drug-Free Community (DFC) Funding Opportunity Announcement is now available online, along with pre-application workshops to help you submit the application in full by the deadline.dfc_infographic

Applicants can either be coalitions who have never received DFC funding (Year 1) or current recipients applying for a second cycle of five years of funding (Year 6) or former recipients who experienced a lapse in funding during a five-year cycle.

DFC Support Program is a federal grant program that provides funding to community-based coalitions that organize to prevent youth substance use. Since the passage of the DFC Act in 1997, the DFC Program has funded more than 2,000 coalitions and currently mobilizes nearly 9,000 community volunteers across the country. The philosophy behind the DFC Program is that local drug problems require local solutions.

Coalitions who have never received DFC funding can apply using this application and coalitions who have received DFC funding in the past should use this application. More information about the application is available on the ONDCP website.

Want hands-on help with your application? Register for a pre-application workshop!

• Wednesday, January 18: Flagstaff, AZ

• Tuesday, January 24: Birmingham, AL

• Thursday, January 26: Dallas, TX

• Friday, February 10: National Harbor, MD (at CADCA’s National Leadership Forum)

Application deadline is 3/15/17


Attention Massachusetts: Tune into “Mass Appeal” this Wednesday, 1/11 at 11am

January 9, 2017

Excited to share the news!

The Botvin Lifeskills Training Program will be featured on the daily hour-long lifestyle program Mass Appeal on WWLP this Wednesday 1/11 between 11am-12pm.

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Tune in to watch Kat Allen from the Communities that Care Coalition, a Partnership for Youth Program of the Franklin Regional Council of Governments, and Kate Blair from the Frontier Regional School in Deerfield as they discuss the successes of implementing Lifeskills Training to help reduce teen drug use in their community.

Studies show that students who go through this program are much less likely to engage in drugs and other forms of dangerous behaviors later in life. Tobacco use was also shown to be reduced by 87% and alcohol use by 60%.

The LifeSkills Training program involves a set curriculum with interactions and role-plays between teachers and students. The teachers have been using the curriculum for more than a year now, and are seeing the results.


Community Foundation accepting applications from youth-focused substance abuse programs

January 2, 2017

The John M. Drogosz Youth Substance Abuse Prevention/Treatment Memorial Fund, a component fund of the Freeport Community Foundation, is accepting applications from youth-focused substance abuse programs.

The fund supports educational, prevention, and/or substance abuse treatment programs focused on helping youth age 21 or younger in Freeport, Illinois. Grant amounts vary on a project-by-project basis.

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US Coins

To be eligible, organizations must have 501(c)(3) status. In addition, the programs or activities for which they seek support must focus on the education, prevention, and/or treatment of substance abuse in youth (defined as 21 or younger) in Freeport.

See the Freeport Community Foundation website for complete program guidelines and application instructions.

Application deadline is 6/1/17


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