Grant Announcements

September 30, 2013

Two amazing organizations are preparing community and educational grant programs to benefit individuals in need.

Description: Land O’Lakes Foundation recognizes rural communities are a cornerstone of American life and has established ongoing giving programs to insure their vitality and growth. Foundation resources are awarded through several programs that donate cash and encourage employee volunteerism in communities across the United States — where over 300,000 farmers, ranchers and employees work in agriculture, food and fiber production, dairy processing and food marketing. The Land O’Lakes Foundation Community Grants Program provides support through cash grants to nonprofit organizations that are working to improve communities where Land O’Lakes has a significant concentration of members or employees. These include organizations: (1) such as United Way that provide funding to community human services. (2) That work to alleviate hunger. (3) Designed to build knowledge and leadership skills of rural youth. (4) Active in addressing and solving community problems. (5) Promoting artistic endeavors — especially in under-served rural areas, touring or outreach programs.

Funder: The Land O’Lakes Foundation

Eligibility: Land O’Lakes Foundation funds national programs and programs in 20 states: Arkansas, California, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin. Generally, grants are restricted to organizations that have been granted tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Amount: Unspecified.

Contact: Link

Application deadline: 10/1/13

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Description: Support will be given to nonprofits that provide academic and vocational opportunities for the disadvantaged. These programs include the purchase of supplies for literacy skills, mentoring, tutoring and career development.

Funder: BJ’s Charitable Foundation

Eligibility: The proposal must be from an organization that is tax-exempt under 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and recognized as a “public charity” by the IRS. The program must align with BJ’s Charitable Foundation’s mission of supporting organizations that provide basic needs services (in the form of hunger prevention, self-sufficiency, healthcare and education) to those in need in the ways we’ve defined above. The program must positively impact communities where BJ’s Clubs are located.

Amount: Unspecified.

Contact: Link.

Application deadline: 10/11/13

Source: http://www.lifeskillstraining.com/grants.php

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New Data on Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use

September 27, 2013

You can now get a first look at the results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States, ages 12 or older.

Survey results present national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products, with a focus on trends between 2011 and 2012, and from 2002 to 2012, as well as differences across population subgroups in 2012. NSDUH national estimates—related to mental health—and NSDUH state-level estimates—related to both substance use and mental health—will be published separately in fall 2013.

Sample Data Highlights:

  • Marijuana was the most commonly used illicit drug. In 2012, there were 18.9 million past-month users.
  • Slightly more than half (52.1 percent) of Americans ages 12 or older reported being current drinkers of alcohol in the 2012 survey, which was similar to the rate reported in 2011 (51.8 percent).
  • In 2012, an estimated 69.5 million Americans ages 12 or older were current (past-month) users of a tobacco product.

View the Results From the 2012 NSDUH

Source: http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USSAMHSA/bulletins/8c4710


LifeSkills Online Training Workshop

September 23, 2013

Want to learn how to implement the most widely used evidence-based prevention program in elementary schools? Register for this workshop on 10/1.

Click here to register.

Source: http://www.lifeskillstraining.com


2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Results

September 23, 2013

This report and the detailed tables present a first look at results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, non institutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. Both the report and detailed tables present national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products, with a focus on trends between 2011 and 2012 and from 2002 to 2012, as well as differences across population subgroups in 2012. NSDUH national estimates related to mental health and NSDUH State-level estimates related to both substance use and mental health will be published in separate releases in the fall of 2013.

Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings pdf icon for The NSDUH Report: Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings (PDF – 3.2 MB)

Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables pdf icon for The NSDUH Report: Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables (PDF – 76 KB)

Source: http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2012SummNatFindDetTables/Index.aspx?utm_source=NCSSLE+Vol+1%2C+Issue+3&utm_campaign=e-Digest+Vol+1+Issue+3&utm_medium=email


Tobacco-Use Prevention Education: Grades 6-12 Cohort J Tier 1

September 19, 2013

Tobacco-Use Prevention Education (TUPE) funds support health education efforts aimed at the prevention and reduction of tobacco use by youth. TUPE in grades six through twelve is funded through a competitive application process. Funding consideration to local educational agencies is based on projects that propose to implement research-validated prevention programs for the general student population, provide youth development activities for both general and priority populations, and provide intervention and cessation services to students currently using tobacco.

Eligibility: Local educational agencies must be certified tobacco-free by July 1, 2013. Funding is available to districts, charter schools, consortium leads, and county offices of education that serve students in grades six through twelve.

Authority: Health & Safety Code 104420; Budget Item: 6110-102-0231

Due Date: January 15, 2014

Contacts:

John Lagomarsino

Phone : 916-323-1540

E-mail : jlagomarsino@cde.ca.gov

 

Source: http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fo/profile.asp?id=3467 , http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/he/at/tupe.asp


Teen Pot Use Linked to Lowering IQ

September 19, 2013

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NEW YORK (AP) — Teens who routinely smoke marijuana risk a long-term drop in their IQ, a new study suggests.

The researchers didn’t find the same IQ dip for people who became frequent users of pot after 18. Although experts said the new findings are not definitive, they do fit in with earlier signs that the drug is especially harmful to the developing brain.

“Parents should understand that their adolescents are particularly vulnerable,'” said lead researcher Madeline Meier of Duke University.

Study participants from New Zealand were tested for IQ at age 13, likely before any significant marijuana use, and again at age 38. The mental decline between those two ages was seen only in those who started regularly smoking pot before age 18.

Richie Poulton, a study co-author and professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand, said the message of the research is to stay away from marijuana until adulthood if possible. “For some it’s a legal issue,” he said, “but for me it’s a health issue.”

Pot is the most popular illegal drug in the world, with somewhere between 119 million and 224 million users between the ages of 15 and 64 as of 2010, the United Nations reported. Within the United States, 23 percent of high school students said they’d recently smoked marijuana, making it more popular than cigarettes, the federal government reported in June.

Young people “don’t think it’s risky,” said Staci Gruber, a researcher at the Harvard-affiliated MacLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass. Gruber, who didn’t participate in the new work, said the idea that marijuana harms the adolescent brain is “something we believe is very likely,” and the new finding of IQ declines warrants further investigation.

Experts said the new research is an advance because its methods avoid criticisms of some earlier work, which generally did not measure mental performance before marijuana use began.

“I think this is the cleanest study I’ve ever read” that looks for long-term harm from marijuana use, said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which helped fund the research.

Ken Winters, a psychiatry professor at the University of Minnesota and senior scientist at the Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia, said the new findings aren’t definitive, but they underscore the importance of studying how marijuana may harm young people. He had no role in the work.

Meier and colleagues reported their work online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It was funded with governmental grants from the United States and Britain, and a foundation in Zurich.

The study drew on survey data from more than 1,000 people in New Zealand, everybody born in the town of Dunedin during a year-long span ending in 1973. In addition to IQ tests, they were interviewed five times between ages 18 and 38, including questions related to their marijuana use.

At age 18, 52 participants indicated they had become dependent on marijuana, meaning that they continued to use it despite its causing significant health, social or legal problems. Ninety-two others reported dependence starting at a later age.

Researchers compared their IQ scores at age 13 to the score at age 38 and found a drop only in those who had become dependent by 18.

Those deemed dependent in three or more surveys had a drop averaging 8 points. For a person of average intelligence, an 8-point drop would mean ranking higher than only 29 percent of the population rather than 50 percent, the researchers said.

Among participants who’d been dependent at 18 and in at least one later survey, quitting didn’t remove the problem. IQ declines showed up even if they’d largely or entirely quit using pot at age 38, analysis showed.

The researchers got similar overall results for IQ decline when they compared participants who reported having used marijuana at least once a week on average for the past year. The researchers had no data on how much was used on each occasion or how potent it was.

Dr. Duncan Clark, a researcher at the University of Pittsburgh, said he’s not convinced that mental decline is only in those who become dependent by age 18. He said the main lesson he sees in the overall study results is that to preserve one’s IQ, it’s best to avoid marijuana entirely, no matter what your age.

The researchers also surveyed people who knew the study participants well at age 38. They found that the more often participants were rated as marijuana-dependent in the surveys over their lifetimes, the more memory and attention problems were noticed by their acquaintances over the previous year.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/teen-pot-linked-later-declines-iq-192328332.html


Four Alcohol Brands Dominate Popular Music Mentions

September 19, 2013

bottlesFour alcohol brands—Patron tequila, Hennessy cognac, Grey Goose vodka, and Jack Daniel’s whiskey—accounted for more than half of alcohol brand mentions in the songs that mentioned alcohol use in Billboard’s most popular song lists in 2009, 2010 and 2011, according to a new study from researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health and the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The study, published online by Substance Use & Misuse and the first to examine the context of specific brand mentions in depth, found that alcohol use was portrayed as overwhelmingly positive, with negative consequences rarely mentioned.

Of the 720 songs examined, 167 (23.2%) mentioned alcohol and 46 (6.4%) mentioned specific alcohol brands. The leading four brands accounted for more than half (51.6%) of all alcohol brand mentions. Alcohol mentions were most common in urban songs (rap, hip-hop and R&B – 37.7% of songs mentioned alcohol), followed by country (21.8%) and pop (14.9%).
At least 14 long-term studies have found that exposure to alcohol marketing in the mass media increases the likelihood that young people will start drinking or, if already drinking, drink more. Adolescents in the U.S. spend approximately 2.5 hours per day listening to music.

“Given the heavy exposure of youth to popular music, these results suggest popular music may serve as a major source of promotion of alcohol use among youth,” said study co-author David Jernigan, PhD, director of CAMY. “The findings lay a strong foundation for further research.”

The researchers used Billboard Magazine annual listings of the most popular songs in 2009, 2010 and 2011 to identify 720 unique songs in four genres: urban, pop, country and rock. Three coders analyzed the lyrics of each song to determine alcohol references, brand references and the context for each.

Researchers found alcohol references in 167 songs. References to tequila, cognac, vodka and champagne brands were more prevalent in urban music (R&B, hip-hop and rap), while references to whiskey and beer brands were more common in country or pop music. There were no references to alcohol in the rock music examined.

“A small number of alcohol brands and beverages appear to make frequent appearances in popular music,” said Michael Siegel, MD, MPH, professor of Community Health Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. “If these exposures are found to influence youth drinking behavior, then further public health efforts must be focused on youth exposure to alcohol portrayals in popular music.”

Alcohol is responsible for at least 4,700 deaths per year among young people under the age of 21 in the U.S. More than 70 percent of high school students have consumed alcohol, and about 22 percent engage in heavy episodic drinking.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health media contact: Tim Parsons at 410-955-7619 ortmparson@jhsph.edu.

Center for Alcohol and Youth Marketing contact: Cassandra Greisen at 410-502-6579 or cgreisen@jhsph.edu.

Source: http://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2013/jernigan-music.html


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