Substance Abuse and Academic Achievement: What Does the Research Say and What is the Federal Prevention Strategy?

Please join colleagues at the U.S. Department of Education

for an education policy briefing on:
Substance Abuse and Academic Achievement

What Does the Research Say and What is the Federal Prevention Strategy?

Thursday Oct. 24, 2013 at 10 a.m. ET

You are invited to a U.S. Department of Education (ED) webcast of a live event which will include a presentation and discussion about substance abuse and academic achievement, and the national drug control strategy elements that focus on preventing such use among youth.

The event is being Webcast live on EDstream:  http://edstream.ed.gov/webcast/Catalog/catalogs/default.aspx

No registration is required, just log on to view it at the time and date below.

NOTE: The event is recorded and you may also view it at a later time on EDstream.

October is National Substance Abuse Prevention Month.  High-risk drinking and illicit drug use contribute to numerous academic, social, and health-related problems for students. What does the research say about the impact of such substance use on academic achievement?    More importantly, what is the national strategy to prevent youth from using or abusing illicit substances, and how do schools play a role in community based coalitions to combat youth substance abuse.

Presenters will include:

  • Amelia M. Arria, Ph.D., Director of the Center on Young Adult Health and Development at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, to discuss the findings in the recent report “America’s Dropout Crisis: The Unrecognized Connection to Substance Use.”
  • David K. Mineta, Deputy Director of Demand Reduction for the White House, Office of National Drug Control Policy, to discuss the National Drug Control Strategy, and the prevention elements focused on youth.
  • Helen Hernandez, White House, Office of National Drug Control Policy (Drug-Free Communities Support Program) to discuss the role of education in community coalitions to prevent illicit substance substance use.
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