Webinar: How LifeSkills Training can Keep Kids Healthy and Drug-free

February 21, 2017

Join us on this free webinar to learn more about the highly effective Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) program and how it can positively impact the lives of youth in elementary, middle, and high school. Explore the LST structure and learn how it can be an effective, enjoyable, and easy-to-teach program!picture1

Botvin LifeSkills Training:   A Proven Program for Drug-free Youth

Space is limited! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.

School districts, individual schools, and their partner agencies are challenged now more than ever with a number of social, emotional, and environmental needs that impact the lives of the youth they serve. Time and resources are at a premium which demands an approach that is not only diverse in it reach, but delivers multiple outcomes, meaningful change, and results.

In fact, the Surgeon General recently named LifeSkills Training (LST) as one of the most effective school-based programs for adolescents aged 10 to 18.*  The LST program is research validated, has universal appeal, is age and developmentally appropriate, will change the lives of the youth you serve for the better.

Join us to learn how the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST)  has been proven to reduce alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drug abuse. In addition, research on LST demonstrated reductions in violence, delinquency, and most recently, prescription and opioid misuse among middle school aged-youth.

*Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, 2016


How to Become a LifeSkills Trainer of Trainers (TOT)

February 20, 2017

tot

Step 1 – Attend a provider training workshop (online or in person).

Step 2 – Implement any level of the LifeSkills Training program for one full cycle.

Step 3 – Fill out the TOT application and email it to training@nhpamail.com

Step 4 – Once your application has been approved, you can register for the next TOT workshop: Greater NYC Area: March 30-31, 2017*

This two-day advanced training workshop teaches you how to deliver and conduct Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) workshops for your organization.  Eligibility is limited to those who complete an LST workshop and implement the program for at least one full semester.

 *Space is very limited; please register early.


Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Grant Money Available

February 16, 2017

Below is a list of funding opportunities that may be applicable for the LifeSkills Training program.  For more detailed information on each funding opportunity and contact information click here.

 

FUNDING FOR BOTVIN LIFESKILLS TRAINING IN PENNSYLVANIA – The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) is accepting applications for Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support a targeted group of evidence-based programs proven to be effective in reducing risk factors and increasing protective factors.  The 2017 Funding Announcement includes a list of programs eligible for funding under this announcement including Botvin LifeSkills Training.

Application deadline is 3/14/17

DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM GRANT – The FY 2017 Drug-Free Communities Support Program funding opportunity by the Office of National Drug Control Policy anticipates award amounts up to $125,000. The DFC Support Program establishes and strengthens collaboration among communities, public and private non-profit agencies; as well as federal, state, local, and tribal governments to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance use among youth.

Application deadline is 3/15/17

GOOD SHEPHERD GRANTS FOR NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA – The Good Shepherd Fund, Inc. offers grants to community agencies for substance abuse prevention and education. Community agencies in Columbus, Bladen, Robeson, New Hanover and Brunswick counties in North Carolina and Horry County of South Carolina are eligible for grant funds. Each year mini grants are awarded on a competitive basis to selected non-profit or governmental agencies.

Application deadline is 3/15/17

GRANT PROJECTS AIMED AT PREVENTING SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN IDAHO – The Idaho Office of Drug Policy (ODP) is accepting applications for grant projects aimed at preventing substance abuse. Public entities and non-profit organizations are eligible for funding and encouraged to apply for grants totaling about $1.6 million annually to Idaho communities for substance abuse prevention programs. ODP endorses Prevention education and training that provides specific skills to participants.

Application deadline is 3/24/17

$3.6 MILLION AVAILABLE FOR BOTVIN LIFESKILLS TRAINING IN ARIZONA – The Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family announced the release of a competitive grant solicitation in a Request for Grant Application for the Arizona High School Health and Wellness Program. The goal of the program is to prevent the onset of underage drinking, marijuana use, and prescription drug misuse and abuse by utilizing evidence based programs. Research has identified Botvin LifeSkills Training as an approved program under this grant.

Application deadline is 4/4/17

VIRGINIA ABC OFFERS ALCOHOL PREVENTION GRANT – In an effort to encourage and support the development of alcohol education and prevention programs across the commonwealth, the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is accepting applications for its 2017-2018 Education and Prevention Grant awards. Grant awards will be limited to a maximum of $8,000 per recipient. Community coalitions, law enforcement agencies, nonprofits, schools, faith-based organizations and prevention groups are encouraged to apply.

Application deadline is 4/25/17

DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION FUND ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS IN ILLINOIS – The Freeport Community Foundation announces that the John M. Drogosz Youth Substance Abuse Prevention/Treatment Memorial Fund will award  grants for educational, prevention, and/or substance abuse treatment programs focused on helping youth age 21 or younger in Freeport, Illinois. Grant amounts vary on a project-by-project basis. To be eligible, organizations must have 501(c)(3) status.

Application deadline is 6/1/17


$3.6 Million In Grant Funding Available For High School Drug Prevention

February 13, 2017

money.jpgThe Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family announced the release of a competitive grant solicitation in a Request for Grant Application for the Arizona High School Health and Wellness Program. The goal of the program is to prevent the onset of underage drinking, marijuana use, and prescription drug misuse and abuse by utilizing evidence based programs.

Successful Applicants who are selected for award shall also implement the prevention education strategy using evidence-based and evidence-informed curricula to high school students. Research has identified Botvin LifeSkills Training as an approved program under this grant.

Eligibility: Arizona High Schools (public and charter), serving 9-12 grade levels.

Prospective Applicants are encouraged to attend a pre-application conference on February 21, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. (Arizona time) at the State Health Laboratory Building, 250 N. 17th Avenue, First Floor Conference Room, Phoenix, Arizona 85007.  The purpose of the conference is to discuss and clarify this Request for Grant Application (“RFGA”).

For more information visit: http://substanceabuse.az.gov/substance-abuse/grants.

Applications are due 4/4/17


Funding Available for LifeSkills Training in Pennsylvania

February 10, 2017

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) is accepting applications for Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support a targeted group of evidence-based programs. Because a substantial body of research exists on the causes and correlates of adolescent problem behaviors, implementing programs that are effective in preventing adolescent problem behaviors continues to be a priority within PCCD. Risk and protective factors related to these behaviors have been identified in many Pennsylvania communities through local community assessments. Supported by strong evaluations, many prevention programs designed to reduce or eliminate risk factors and facilitate protective factors have already been implemented across the Commonwealth.PCCDLogo-2C

To enable communities to implement such programs, PCCD is making available State Delinquency Prevention Programs Funds to support evidence-based prevention programs. This funding is intended for new program implementations, expansions of an existing program into a new and distinct geographic area, or for the support of Big Brothers Big Sisters Program Operations. This funding is meant to help enable communities to build upon existing adolescent problem behavior prevention efforts that were developed through collaborative risk-focused prevention approaches.

Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) – Middle School is eligible for funding under this announcement.

All applications must be submitted electronically through PCCD’s Egrants System no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. The Egrants Help Desk is available to assist with questions until 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Contact the PCCD Egrants Help Desk at (717) 787-5887 or by email at: RA-eGrantsSupport@pa.gov.

Application deadline is 3/14/17


$1.6 million in Grants available to Idaho Communities for Drug prevention

February 3, 2017

The Idaho Office of Drug Policy (ODP) is now accepting applications for grant projects aimed at preventing substance abuse in Idaho. Public entities and non-profit organizations are eligible for funding and encouraged to apply for grants totaling about $1.6 million annually to Idaho communities for substance abuse prevention programs.“We are excited to continue funding this grant program focused on the primary prevention of substance abuse,” ODP Administrator Elisha Figueroa said. “We know that the implementation of evidence-based prevention strategies by passionate, dedicated prevention providers and community members make Idaho a safer and healthier place to live, work and recreate. What’s more, these folks save lives.”

The federal grant funding is intended for direct service programs and community programs/activities designed to reduce the impact of substance abuse on Idaho youth, families and communities. The program’s goal is to create healthy environments by implementing comprehensive strategies for promoting positive, sustainable and lasting change. ODP endorses the following prevention strategies:

• Information dissemination about the nature and extent of drug use, abuse, addiction and the effects on individuals, families and communities.

Prevention education and training that provides specific skills to participants.

• Alternative activities for youth that exclude drug use and promote healthy lifestyles.

• Community-based processes that enhance the community’s ability to more effectively provide prevention services.

• Environmental strategies that establish or change community standards, codes, laws, policies, norms and attitudes, thereby influencing consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in communities.

• Problem identification and referral to identify those who may be misusing or abusing substances in order to provide resources and refer them to treatment, if necessary.

ODP recognizes that local communities are powerful places to shape the health, safety and well-being of children and families, so it strives to support evidence-based programs that impact every region of Idaho. To advance those programs, the agency will accept grant applications for fiscal year 2018 until March 24.


Groundhog Day or Hedgehog Day?

February 2, 2017

National Geographic News talks about Groundhog Day, Punxsutawney Phil, and the weather. They include a look at the origins of February 2nd forecasting, which began with the Roman Empire, when folks considered the weather on Candlemas to predict future weather.

cnwnr8zxaaa71ma

(LifeSkills mascot “Squillex” the Hedgehog predicts healthy and drug-free youth)

Legend has it that the Romans also believed that conditions during the first days of February were good predictors of future weather, but the empire looked to hedgehogs for their forecasts.

These two traditions melded in Germany and were brought over to the United States by German immigrants who settled in Pennsylvania. Lacking hedgehogs, the German settlers substituted native groundhogs in the ritual, and Groundhog Day was born.

So have we’ve been using the wrong animal all these years? Should we instead say “Happy Hedgehog Day”?


%d bloggers like this: