Free webinar, 8/26 at 11am ET

August 25, 2016

There’s still time to register for Friday’s webinar:

Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training Parent Program

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We’re excited to this free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

Space is limited.  Click this link to register


Kick off the new school year with LifeSkills

August 23, 2016

midschool-330-2Are you ready for the new school year?

Join us on a complimentary webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…

Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

We’re excited to offer a series of free webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

WEBINAR SCHEDULE

High School Program – Wednesday, 8/24 (11am ET – noon)

Transitions Program – Thursday, 8/25 (11am ET – noon)

Parent Program – Friday, 8/26 (11am ET – noon)

NEW DATES ADDED

Middle School Program – Wednesday, 9/7 (3pm ET – 4pm)

Elementary School Program – Wednesday, 9/21 (3pm ET – 4pm)

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 


Are you ready for the new school year? Join us on a webinar for new and veteran LST teachers…

August 16, 2016
Preparing for Success with LifeSkills Training

We’re excited to offer a series of webinars designed to help anyone looking to implement the LST program at any level.  Our goal is to help you successfully kick off your implementation of LST!  This informative webinar will discuss and present information related to:

  • Implementing with fidelity
  • Resources for teachers and students
  • Raising awareness about your program
  • Q & A

WEBINAR SCHEDULE

Elementary School Program – Monday, 8/22 (11am ET – noon)

Middle School Program – Tuesday, 8/23 (11am ET – noon)

High School Program – Wednesday, 8/24 (11am ET – noon)

Transitions Program – Thursday, 8/25 (11am ET – noon)

Parent Program – Friday, 8/26 (11am ET – noon)

No experience required. All are welcome, however space is limited. 

 


Head back to school with LifeSkills

August 9, 2016

Promote educational success by teaching students life skills to:

*Enhance self-esteem13912761_10153867532045857_56361278605721723_n

*Develop problem-solving abilities

*Reduce stress and anxiety

*Communicate clearly and resolve conflicts

*Build effective resistance pressures to use tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs

As you head back to school, let us help you plan your health and wellness strategy with one-page overviews of our programs, as well as samples and preview copies of Teacher’s Manuals and Student Guides. We can even host a webinar for you and your staff to learn more about a specific LifeSkills Training program.

Contact us to learn more at lstinfo@nhpamail.com or 800-293-4969


The Truth About Drug Use in Middle School Students

July 27, 2016

rx.jpgPrescription drugs can do a lot to help people with medical conditions and, when used appropriately, they can have a positive impact. Unfortunately, many of these drugs are misused and abused by middle-school-aged youth. According to the 2014 Monitoring the Future Survey, the prevalence of prescription drug use in 8th graders was 1.7% and rose to 4.7% by 12th grade. Thirty-three percent of teens believe it is okay to use prescription drugs for an injury, illness, or physical pain even if it has not been prescribed for them. And in 2012, The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study found that a total of 20% of children have misused or abused a prescription drug before the age of 14. Thus, it is essential to educate students on how not to take drugs prescribed to others.

Prescription drug abuse is many times a result of boredom, a need to escape troubles, or a longing to get high. Social pressures and the overwhelming desire to look “cool” in the eyes of peers can also be a driving factor to engage in these behaviors. Students may urge others to use prescription drugs by saying the common phrase “just try it for fun.” Prescription drug abuse has also become more prevalent because of easy accessibility in the family medicine cabinet. A suggested method of prevention is for parents to talk to their children through times of pressure or unhappiness

National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) is aware of this issue, and is currently creating new sessions on prescription drug abuse for middle-school-aged youth. Based on Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST), the goal of this program is to bring attention to the dangers of prescription drug abuse and misuse while teaching students the skills to refuse them. This adaptation will educate youth on healthy behavioral practices as well as help to deter them from engaging in dangerous health behaviors.

Sources: Monitoring the future national survey results on drug use, 1975–2013: Volume I, secondary school students, University of Utah Health Care.

Writer: Amanda Flower is a rising junior majoring in Public Health at Muhlenberg College

 


Prescription Drug Abuse: Sharing Is Not Caring

July 26, 2016

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine reported that nearly 60 percent of Americans have opioid painkillers that they no longer use. Within this group, 20 percent of participants stated they shared their opioid painkillers with another person.

Those who shared their medication reported that the primary reason for doing so was to help the other person manage their pain. The second most reported reason was because the person asking for the medication did not have the money to pay for the medication or did not have health insurance.

Possession of opioids by people other than the patients to whom they were prescribed is a growing problem, because misusing prescription medication is both physically harmful and illegal.

Because prescription medication is widely used for the treatment of an array of illnesses and disorders, many Americans do not see a problem with sharing their prescription medication to help their friends and family. In an article in the Washington Post, Johns-Hopkins professor Colleen L. Barry calls for a change of public opinion, stating that it is crucial that officials send “a clear-cut public health message that these medications should never be shared in any circumstance.”

The amount of prescription drug abuse is on the rise, especially among adolescents. In a study published by University of Central Florida professor Jason A. Ford, Ph.D., 22 percent of high school students reported nonmedical use of prescription drugs at some point in their lifetime, with 15 percent reporting nonmedical prescription drug abuse within the last year.

Researchers at National Health Promotion Associates are working to develop a Middle School Prescription Drug Abuse program. The program, based on their LifeSkills Training program, aims to prevent drug use by teaching adolescents to use personal self-management skills, social competency skills, and drug refusal skills.  Developers of the program hope to see reductions in abuse by raising awareness at an early age of the potential harm that can come from sharing prescription drugs and providing the tools needed to increase resilience and stimulate personal growth.

The Food and Drug Administration lists proper disposal techniques as one way  of preventing nonmedical prescription drug abuse. To dispose of unused prescription drugs, drop them off at an authorized collector in your community. You can find authorized collectors in your community by calling your local law-enforcement agency or doing an Internet search to locate prescription drug take-back programs.

Sources: DrugFree.org, The Washington Post, Jama Internal Medicine, The Prevention Researcher

Writer: Brooke Dugan is a rising senior majoring in Psychology and Communication at Loyola University Maryland.  


Parent Program Leader Training Workshop

June 21, 2016
The LifeSkills Training Parent Program is proven to help families by strengthening family communication.* The program helps keep children from using drugs, is ideal for parenting workshops or self-paced, and is available in Spanish.

Register today and learn how to implement the LifeSkills Training Parent Program

ParentingClick the link  below for an enrollment form and fax or email it to olt@nhpamail.com

June 29, 2016 – 11am (ET)

Space is limited!

 

 

*A study in the Journal of Child and Family Studies shows that family-based prevention programs can be an effective way to prevent adolescent substance use.

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