Schools Ramping Up Opioid Abuse Program – WSJ

December 2, 2016

Many U.S. schools are ramping up campaigns to prevent opioid abuse among students as evidence mounts of a growing problem.

In some regions, schools are teaching a substance-abuse-prevention program developed at Cornell University to students as young as fourth grade.


WSJ: Schools Step Up Efforts to Fight Opioid Abuse

November 15, 2016
On Friday The Wall Street Journal featured an article and video highlighting the LifeSkills Training program. See below for the full article link and click the image to watch an interview with program developer Dr. Gilbert J. Botvin. 

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wsjMany U.S. schools are ramping up campaigns to prevent opioid abuse among students as evidence mounts of a growing problem.

Some are inviting pharmacists to schools to convey the dangers of prescription pills. Others are offering emergency counseling via text message. In some regions, schools are teaching a substance-abuse-prevention program developed at Cornell University to students as young as fourth grade… Click to read full article


Prescription Drug Abuse: Sharing Is Not Caring

July 26, 2016

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine reported that nearly 60 percent of Americans have opioid painkillers that they no longer use. Within this group, 20 percent of participants stated they shared their opioid painkillers with another person.

Those who shared their medication reported that the primary reason for doing so was to help the other person manage their pain. The second most reported reason was because the person asking for the medication did not have the money to pay for the medication or did not have health insurance.

Possession of opioids by people other than the patients to whom they were prescribed is a growing problem, because misusing prescription medication is both physically harmful and illegal.

Because prescription medication is widely used for the treatment of an array of illnesses and disorders, many Americans do not see a problem with sharing their prescription medication to help their friends and family. In an article in the Washington Post, Johns-Hopkins professor Colleen L. Barry calls for a change of public opinion, stating that it is crucial that officials send “a clear-cut public health message that these medications should never be shared in any circumstance.”

The amount of prescription drug abuse is on the rise, especially among adolescents. In a study published by University of Central Florida professor Jason A. Ford, Ph.D., 22 percent of high school students reported nonmedical use of prescription drugs at some point in their lifetime, with 15 percent reporting nonmedical prescription drug abuse within the last year.

Researchers at National Health Promotion Associates are working to develop a Middle School Prescription Drug Abuse program. The program, based on their LifeSkills Training program, aims to prevent drug use by teaching adolescents to use personal self-management skills, social competency skills, and drug refusal skills.  Developers of the program hope to see reductions in abuse by raising awareness at an early age of the potential harm that can come from sharing prescription drugs and providing the tools needed to increase resilience and stimulate personal growth.

The Food and Drug Administration lists proper disposal techniques as one way  of preventing nonmedical prescription drug abuse. To dispose of unused prescription drugs, drop them off at an authorized collector in your community. You can find authorized collectors in your community by calling your local law-enforcement agency or doing an Internet search to locate prescription drug take-back programs.

Sources: DrugFree.org, The Washington Post, Jama Internal Medicine, The Prevention Researcher

Writer: Brooke Dugan is a rising senior majoring in Psychology and Communication at Loyola University Maryland.  


Fighting addiction before it starts | The Recorder

May 19, 2015

The Franklin Regional Council of Governments was among 26 municipalities and institutions awarded $2.9 million in grants through the Department of Public Health Monday, money the administration said is intended to combat opioid abuse before it starts.

Locally, it means continued life for the Communities that Care Coalition’s efforts.

Rachel Stoler, the Council of Government’s Partnership for Youth co-coordinator, said the Partnership has held a grant for the past seven years or so on behalf of the Communities that Care Coalition to address underage drinking. The money has been used for compliance checks and social marketing and social norms campaigns, and teacher trainings in the Botvin LifeSkills curriculum to prevent youth substance abuse and violence.

via Fighting addiction before it starts | The Recorder.


NYS OASAS is seeking funding proposals from not-for-profit community coalitions in New York State whose principal mission is the goal of reducing substance abuse among youth

March 3, 2015

New York State Partnership for Success:  The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (NYS OASAS) announces the availability of funds to implement the Strategic Prevention Framework process at the community level. Communities in New York State that can demonstrate a high need to address prescription drug misuse and abuse, heroin abuse, and heroin opiate overdose among persons aged 12-25 and that possess a community coalition that can demonstrate a high capacity to address these issues, are eligible to participate in the competitive RFP process.

Eligible Applicants: NYS OASAS is seeking funding proposals from not-for-profit community coalitions in New York State whose principal mission is the goal of reducing substance abuse among youth. If the coalition does not have 501c 3 status or does not have an established fiscal agent with 501c 3 status, a NYS OASAS-funded prevention provider must act as the fiscal agent for the community coalition. Community coalitions that received funds through the previous SPF-SIG Prevention First NY! Initiative will not be eligible to apply for this Partnership for Success (PFS) funding. 

Bidders’ Conference:  A non-mandatory Bidders’ Conference will be held on Monday, March 16, 2015 from 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m. in Conference Room 2B at NYS OASAS’ main offices, located at 1450 Western Avenue, Albany, New York 12203.  Bidders may participate by telephone, or in person.. To confirm your attendance, please contact Filomena Bassotti at 518-485-6022 or filomenabassotti@oasas.ny.gov  by 5 p.m. Friday March 13, 2015.

via LifeSkills Training: Funding Opportunities.


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